Events

Calendar

April 2016

SHOPTALKS

Eva von Dassow - Theology of Liberation in the Second Millennium BCE

  • Monday, 4 April 2016 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Around 1400 BCE, Hittite scribes recorded a Hurrian epic poem entitled "Song of Liberation" in a bilingual edition, fragments of which were discovered in 1983 (CE) in Hattusha, capital city of Hatti.  The poem tells a mytho-historical tale turning on the gods' demand that the city of Ebla release the people of another city, Igingallish, whom they have subjected.  But the senate of Ebla refuses to grant release, exercising their liberty as a body of free men to deny liberty to those who serve them.  The city of Ebla was indeed destroyed around 1600 BCE, and this poem explains why.  What was the condition of liberty to which the gods demanded that the subjected people be released, and why did this interest the scribes of Hatti two centuries later?

Eva M. Von Dassow is the National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and Associate Professor of Classics and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Minnesota.

SHOPTALKS

David Schutter - Drawing on Drawing

  • Wednesday, 6 April 2016 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

David Schutter is the Jules Guerin/Jacob H. Lazarus-Metropolitan Museum of Art Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome and Associate Professor in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of Chicago.
 

Lecture

Peter Struck - Between Ancient Divination and Modern Intuition: A Cognitive History

  • Thursday, 7 April 2016 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Ancient Greeks drew advice from oracles, dreams, entrails, the movements of birds, sneezes, and myriad other sources for divination. Classicists typically study such phenomena as examples of occult religion, or for their use as a social mechanism for managing dissent and forging consensus. Ancient philosophical accounts by contrast go a longer way toward considering them seriously, on their own terms. They take them as an invitation into developing speculative accounts of non-standard cognitive capacities, akin to what we would call intuition. Plato and Aristotle will serve as case studies to launch a broader consideration of intuition in cognitive history.

Peter Struck is the Lucy Shoe Meritt Scholar in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring 2016 and Professor of Classics at the University of Pennsylvania.

The lecture will be held in English.

You can watch this event live at: http://livestream.com/aarome

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

Jenny R. Kreiger - Working for the Dead: Approaches to Labor in the Catacombs

  • Monday, 11 April 2016 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Catacombs (subterranean cemeteries) served as sites of burial, memory, and cult on the outskirts of some cities in late antiquity. Despite the long, rich history of catacomb exploration and scholarship, many questions still remain about day-to-day affairs at these sites when they were active cemeteries. Who dug the catacombs, made the paintings and inscriptions, and managed the ongoing care of the dead? How did they organize themselves, and what role did they play in shaping commemorative traditions? This presentation outlines the problems that face any study of catacomb material and the range of methods Kreiger employs to learn more about the workers who made the catacombs and their contents.

Jenny R. Kreiger is the Emeline Hill Richardson/Samuel H. Kress Foundation /Helen M. Woodruff Fellowship of the Archaeological Institute of America Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow (year one of a two -year fellowship) in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and a Ph.D. candidate in the Interdepartmental Program of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Michigan.
 

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conference

Photographic Archives and Contemporary Art in Italy: Investigation, Interpretation, Inspiration

  • Wednesday, 13 April 2016 - 10:00am to 6:00pm
  • Thursday, 14 April 2016 - 10:00am to 4:30pm
Istituto Centrale per la Grafica - Via Poli 54
Contact sheet of photographs taken by Plinio De Martiis, gallerist of La Tartaruga, and published in the gallery's magazine, "Catalogo" (1963). The photographs document an exhibition of work by Gianfranco Baruchello and Marcel Duchamp.

This event is part of the New Work in the Arts & Humanities: Bodies of Knowledge series.

Photography in the postwar period became an essential element of visual experimentation in its dual capacity as both a component of and a vehicle for the work of art. If today the use of photography within the artistic field and the photographic documentation of the work of art constitute solid areas of research, little attention has been given to the photographic archives themselves as sources for the study of contemporary art. The photographic archive should in fact be considered not merely as a collection of anonymous information or pictures, but as a complex body, defined by the visual cultures of diverse subjects (artists, professional photographers, gallery photographers, etc), characterized by a problematic heterogeneity of documents (negatives, proofs, prints, annotations, correspondence, bibliographic materials), and organized materially according to variable logics of production and circulation.

The conference intends to present and discuss research on the photographic archives of artists and photographers that documented artistic practice in Italy from the 1960s to the 1980s, with particular regard to the context of production, collection, and circulation of photographs. As opposed to the fetishization of a single authored snapshot, particular focus will be given to studies that recuperate the place of images within an originating series, that reconstruct the reasons for its extraction and that analyze the reuse of photographs in either the linguistics of the artist’s montage or in their diffusion within various editorial contexts.  

By way of a suitable number of case studies the conference therefore proposes to clarify the avenues by which some artworks or events, as determined by the selective reproduction and entrance into history of their image, become icons of contemporaneity. It aims to restore to such works the complexity and visual stratification that have accompanied their genesis and use by reconstructing the contexts that witnessed the elaboration of new styles and by redefining the professional identities of the artist and the photographer and the interchange between them.

Organized by the Department of Humanities at Roma Tre University, the American Academy in Rome, and Rome’s Istituto Centrale per la Grafica, the conference will take place over the course of two days. Presentations will be organized into three distinct sessions dedicated to questions of methodology in the study of photographic archives, to artistic culture in Rome between 1960-1980, and to analogous stylistic and chronological practices in diverse geographic contexts.

Conference Location:
Istituto Centrale per la Grafica, Sala Dante
entrance through Palazzo Poli, Via Poli, 54
Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40x35x15 (inches 16x14x6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Papers will be presented in English and Italian.

Conference organizing committee: Barbara Cinelli (Università Roma Tre), Antonello Frongia (Università Roma Tre), Maria Antonella Fusco (Istituto Centrale per la Grafica, Roma), Lindsay Harris (American Academy in Rome), Laura Iamurri (Università Roma Tre).

Conference collaborators:
Dipartimento degli Studi Umanistici di Roma Tre
Istituto Centrale per la Grafica

Contact: Elisa Francesconi elisa.francesconi@uniroma3.it

Contact sheet of photographs taken by Plinio De Martiis, gallerist of La Tartaruga, and published in the gallery's magazine, "Catalogo" (1963). The photographs document the inauguration of an exhibition of work by Gianfranco Baruchello and Marcel Duchamp.

Conversation

William Kentridge in conversation with Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev

  • Friday, 15 April 2016 - 6:00pm
British School at Rome - Via Antonio Gramsci 61
Photo by Marc Shoul

The artist William Kentridge will talk about his work with Carolyn Christov- Bakargiev, Director of the Castello di Rivoli and the GAM, Turin.
 

The event is organized in partnership with the British School at Rome and in collaboration with Tevereterno.

SHOPTALKS

Steven Ellis - The Social Structures of a Roman City: Context and Complexity in the Archaeological Excavations of a Sub-elite Pompeian Neighborhood

  • Monday, 18 April 2016 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

The aim of this shop-talk is to outline some of the ways in which stories of urban complexity can be told from archaeological remains.  The subject is the Roman city of Pompeii, specifically the neighborhood under excavation by the University of Cincinnati and the American Academy in Rome.  In bringing these excavations to publication, some newer approaches are being explored (and remain needed) to tell both the structural and social making of a city.    

Steven Ellis is the ACLS/Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellow at the American Academy in Rome and Associate Professor at the Department of Classics at the
University of Cincinnati.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conversations/Conversazioni

David Stone with Patrizia Cavazzini - Preparing the Artist: Guercino’s Drawings as Experience and Experiment

  • Tuesday, 19 April 2016 - 6:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome
Guercino; Study for the Martyrdom of Saints John and Paul; pen, ink, wash; London, Courtauld Institute; 1632; recto.

This event is part of the New Work in the Arts & Humanities: Bodies of Knowledge series.

David Stone, a leading authority on Guercino and Caravaggio, discusses problems of function, technique, mode, narrative and spirituality in the preparatory drawings of Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, called Il Guercino (1591-1666). How does Guercino’s open-ended design process compare with the rigid pricing system he used for selling his painted works? In conversation with Patrizia Cavazzini, an expert on the economics of baroque art, Stone will try to assess Guercino’s artistic personality, comparing his values and marketing strategies to those of contemporaries such as Guido Reni.

David Stone is the James S. Ackerman Scholar in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring 2016 and Professor of Art History at the University of Delaware.

The lecture will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Benefit

2016 Spring Gala – NYC

  • Wednesday, 20 April 2016 - 6:30pm
The Four Seasons Restaurant
New York City

Spring Gala 
Wednesday, 20 April, 2016 

Honoring 
Anthony Grafton Historian

Billie Tsien & Tod Williams Architects

Alice Waters Food activist and author

6:30 pm Cocktail Reception
7:30 pm Dinner and Program

The Four Seasons Restaurant
99 East 52nd Street
New York City

Black Tie

Co-Chairs 
Suzanne Deal Booth 
Cary J. Davis
 

To reserve your seats, please contact 
Aurica Kastner at: a.kastner@aarome.org 
or 212-751-7200 x351.

RSVP ONLINE

Conference

Fable Style

  • Thursday, 21 April 2016 - 2:00pm to 7:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Pablo Picasso, The Hen and the Cat, 1953.

Discussing the writing of fables, the rhetorician Nicolaus, who taught in Constantinople in the reign of emperor Leo (A.D. 457-74), recommends an approach that aptly describes what we encounter in the collections of Aesop’s fables that survive from antiquity. Nicolaus writes: “The language (phrasis) should be very simple, straightforward, unassuming, and free of all subtlety and periodic expression, so that the meaning is absolutely clear and the words do not appear to be loftier in stature than the actors, especially when these are animals” (Nicolaus, Progymnasmata, 2.11). Writers of fables and fairy tales throughout history, from Phaedrus to Calvino, have cultivated a similar aesthetic – a simple style matched to the putative simplicity of the tales themselves. But what is actually involved in this kind of stylization? How is a simple style of writing determined, how is it achieved? Moreover, do the standards change over time, or is there some stable idea of simplicity that obtains in different times and places?

This one-day conference, in English and Italian, brings together leading scholars of fable, fairy tale, and storytelling to consider the place of style in the history of fable-writing.  The central questions to be explored include: What is gained and what is lost when popular forms of storytelling are transformed into literature?  How is orality represented in our written sources? Does the collecting and archiving of fables necessitate a kind of stylization and a subsequent loss of authenticity? To what extent does fable/fiaba/favola remain a meaningful idiom for contemporary
writers?

Speakers include: Caterina Mordeglia (Università degli Studi di Trento), Stefano Jedrkiewicz (independent scholar), Giuseppe Crimi (Università degli Studi Roma Tre), Giovanni Zago (Università degli Studi di Firenze), Laura Di Nicola (Sapienza Università di Roma), Mario Casari (Sapienza Università di Roma). 

Presentations will be in English and Italian.

Organizer: Jeremy Lefkowitz, Swarthmore College and American Academy in Rome, jlefkow1@swarthmore.edu

This project is made possible by the Fellows Project Fund of the American Academy in Rome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conversations/Conversazioni

2016 Rome Prize Ceremony

  • Thursday, 21 April 2016 - 6:30pm
The New School
New York City

Each year the Rome Prize is awarded to emerging artists and scholars who represent the highest standard of excellence in the arts and humanities. 

Please join us as we announce the 2016-2017 Rome Prize Winners and Italian Fellows at the Arthur and Janet C. Ross Rome Prize Ceremony. The ceremony will include Conversations | Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome, featuring a discussion between Anthony Grafton (2004 Resident) and Christopher Celenza (1994 Fellow). Grafton and Celenza will talk about the development of language to communicate across disciplines in the arts and humanities.

A prosecco toast will Follow

Thursday, April 21, 2016 at 6:30 PM
Alvin Johnson/J.M. Kaplan Hall (Auditorium)
The New School
66 West 12th Street
New York City

This event is free to the public, however RSVPs are required:

RSVP ONLINE

Anthony Grafton  is the Henry Putnam Professor in the Department of History at Princeton University. He earned his A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. He has held fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and has won the International Balzan Prize and the Mellon Foundation's Distinguished Achievement Award.  Professor Grafton is author or co-author of many books, including Joseph Scaliger: A Study in the History of Classical Scholarship and most recently Henricus Glareanus’s (1488-1563) Chronologia of the Ancient World. He has served as curator for two exhibitions: "New Worlds, Ancient Texts" at the New York Public Library (1992 to 1993); and "Rome Reborn: The Vatican Library and Renaissance Culture" at the Library of Congress (1993). 

Christopher S. Celenza holds a PhD from Duke University and a DrPhil from the University of Hamburg, as well as a BA and MA from SUNY-Albany. Currently the Charles Homer Haskins Professor at Johns Hopkins University, he has a dual appointment in the Department of German and Romance Languages and Literatures and in the Department of Classical Studies. Professor Celenza is the founding Director of the Singleton Center for the Study of Premodern Europe and the Vice Dean for Humanities and Social Sciences. He is the author of many books including Machiavelli: A Portrait and The Lost Italian Renaissance (winner of the  Gordan Prize of the Renaissance Society of America and named a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title). In addition to his Rome Prize Fellowship, he has held fellowships from the ACLS, Villa I Tatti, the Fulbright Foundation and the Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Celenza served as the 21st Director of the American Academy in Rome from 2010 to 2014.

RSVP ONLINE

You can watch this event live at:
https://livestream.com/aarome

For further information, please contact Shawn Miller at 
212-751-7200 ext. 344 or s.miller@aarome.org

Lecture

Adrian Forty - Concrete and Culture

  • Thursday, 28 April 2016 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
copyright Jason Larkin/Panos Pictures

This event is part of the New Work in the Arts & Humanities: Bodies of Knowledge series.

Concrete is second only to water as the world’s most ubiquitous and abundant product – around three tons are produced every year for every man woman and child on the planet. The universal medium of construction, it is often blamed for making everywhere the same, erasing nature, and obliterating local differences. Yet as well as being one of the basics of modern life, it is also a medium of culture, through which all kinds of desires and differences are inflected, sometimes intentionally, sometimes not. Forty’s interest has been in how to make sense of this generic substance, which often seems to be taken to stand for matter itself.

The lecture will look at some of the ways in which concrete has operated as a cultural medium, and at how it has affected our perceptions of ourselves and of our relationships to others in the world. Usually regarded as the material of fixity and stability, it turns out, on the contrary, to be one of the most labile substances around.  

Adrian Forty is the Louis Kahn Scholar in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring 2016 and Emeritus Professor of the History of Architecture at The Bartlett School of Architecture at University College London.

You can watch this event live at:

https://livestream.com/aarome/events/5289442

The lecture will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.