Events

Calendar

March 2017

Conversations/Conversazioni

Conversations – New Terrain

  • Thursday, 2 March 2017 - 6:30pm
Whitney Museum of American Art
New York

CONVERSATIONS – NEW TERRAIN

JULIA CZERNIAK
Professor and Associate Dean, Syracuse Architecture
MARY MARGARET JONES
President/Senior Principal, Hargreaves Associates (1998 Fellow)
MICHAEL MANFREDI
Co-Founder, Weiss/Manfredi  
GREGG PASQUARELLI
Co-Founder, SHoP Architects

In collaboration with the Enel Foundation.

Thursday, March 2, 2017, 6:30pm
Whitney Museum of American Art,
Susan and John Hess Family Theater
99 Gansevoort Street, NYC

Please join us for a panel discussion featuring some of the world’s leading practitioners of landscape architecture, architecture and urban design sharing thoughts related to the complex weave of manmade and natural systems. The panel will review innovative design strategies for the reclamation of brownfields and other disturbed landscapes, and discuss a variety of approaches for their reuse. Speakers will also address the challenges of large-scale development projects that require cooperation between communities and public and private organizations. Examples range from the adaptive re-use project of Brooklyn Bridge Park to the grounds of the Sydney Olympics, among other projects.

You can watch this event live at: https://livestream.com/aarome

For further information, please contact Shawn Miller at  212-751-7200 ext. 344 or s.miller@aarome.org

The 2016-17 season of Conversations/Conversazioni is sponsored by The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

SHOPTALKS

Leon Grek - Staging the City: Comic Translation in Rome and London

  • Monday, 6 March 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

In both classical antiquity and the European Renaissance, dramatic comedy was the literary genre most closely associated with the city, and with the everyday lives of its urban audiences. It was also among the most mobile of cultural forms. Festival-goers in Republican Rome watched Latin translations of Greek comedies set in Athens, Ephesus, and Cyrene; sixteenth-century Ferrarese nobles had a taste for Italian adaptations of Roman comedies with local settings; and audiences at London’s Globe Theater enjoyed English imitations of classicizing Italian comedies, set in Florence, Venice, and Padua. This talk will consider the interactions between these two dynamics – comic urbanism on the one hand, comic translation on the other – in Rome at the beginning of the second century BCE, and in London at the end of the sixteenth century CE. In both cases, I will suggest, comic translation played an important role in helping to define the status of the rapidly expanding, but still peripheral imperial metropolis in relation to its broader Mediterranean cultural world.

Leon Grek is the Paul Mellon / Frank Brown Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies at the American Academy in Rome and a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Comparative Literature at Princeton University, New Jersey.

The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

Tomaso De Luca - A Single Man - Desire and Architecture in Public and Private Spaces

  • Wednesday, 8 March 2017 - 6:30pm
Studio 303

Tomaso De Luca will focus on architecture as a mise en scène capable of ordering and exhibiting its content, of responding to desire or even of engendering it. In the postwar West, the processes of spectacularization and performativity, traditionally characteristic of the architecture of public buildings, spread to private residences as well, providing a glimpse into the rise of media technology as we know it today. The talk will examine the role of the single man, and the correlation between gender, desire, art and architecture. 

Tomaso De Luca is the Cy Twombly Italian Fellow in Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome. 

The shoptalk will be given in English. 

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conference

Ovid: Death and Transfiguration

  • Thursday, 9 March 2017 - 9:30am to 7:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

The title of this conference reflects the fact that 2017 marks the 2000th anniversary of the poet's own death. This is a conventional reckoning: nothing in Ovid's poetry can be dated after AD 17, but we have no external evidence about when he died, and the alludes both to this and to other uncertainties regarding death as a theme in Ovid's poetry. In his love poetry, Ovid does not share the often morbid fascination with death that characterizes his elegiac predecessors, Tibullus and Propertius. In his later poetry, death takes different forms, including bodily metamorphosis, literary canonization, and political exile. The conference will focus on these and related aspects, including the earliest stages of Ovid's posthumous reception.

The conference is organized in collaboration with Sapienza Università di Roma. The first day (March 9) of the three-day conference will be held at the American Academy in Rome and the second and third days (March 10-11) at Sapienza Università di Roma.

9 March 2017
American Academy in Rome
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Sala Conferenze

10 March 2017
Sapienza Università di Roma
Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5
Odeion, Facoltà di Letteree Filosofia

11 March 2017
Sapienza Università di Roma
Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5
​Aula I, Facoltà di Letteree Filosofia

Participants: Alessandro BARCHIESI, Bettina BERGMANN, Francesca Romana BERNO, Alessandro BETORI, Emma BUCKLEY, Sergio CASALI, Andrea CUCCHIARELLI, Jacqueline FABRE-SERRIS, Joseph FARRELL, Laurel FULKERSON, Luigi GALASSO, Philip HARDIE, Stephen HINDS, Alison KEITH, Florence KLEIN, Mario LABATE, Giuseppe LA BUA, John MILLER, Damien NELIS, Ellen OLIENSIS, Bettina REITZ JOOSE, Gianpiero ROSATI, Alessandro SCHIESARO, Alison SHARROCK, Thea THORSEN, Katharina VOLK, Anke WALTER

Papers will be given in English and Italian. On March 9, you can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

Organizers: Joe Farrell (University of Pennsylvania, RAAR’13), Alessandro Schiesaro (University of Manchester), Damien Nelis (University of Geneva), John Miller (University of Virginia).

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

Michael Queenland - Points of Convergence

  • Monday, 13 March 2017 - 6:30pm
Studio 126

In this talk, focusing primarily on ongoing work begun here in Rome of collecting city detritus and transforming it through various strategies of ordering, patterning, and flattening, Michael Queenland will discuss the urban context as a source of inspiration and discovery; as a space where the social, temporal and aesthetic converge accidentally, momentarily, and coincidentally from multiple points of view.

Michael Queenland is the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome.

The shoptalk will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conversations/Conversazioni

David Lang and Nicola Piovani - Soundtracks

  • Tuesday, 14 March 2017 - 6:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome
Sumi Jo sings David Lang's "Simple Song #3" from Youth (La Giovinezza), directed by Paolo Sorrentino.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

In this conversation, part of the Academy’s ongoing series of events dedicated to American Classics, David Lang and Nicola Piovani will discuss their respective work for cinema, considering the importance of contemporary music to cinematic narrative.

Pulitzer-Prize winning composer David Lang contributed the songs “I Lie” and “World to Come” to the soundtrack of Paolo Sorrentino’s The Great Beauty (La Grande Bellezza), an ode to the Eternal City, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2013 before going on to win the Oscar for best foreign language film at the 86th Academy Awards. In the opening scene, a women’s chorus sings a Minimalist sacred composition by Lang within the vaulted spaces of the Fontana dell' Acqua Paola, on the Janiculum Hill. Lang was nominated for an Oscar for the haunting “Simple Song #3,” which he composed for Sorrentino’s La giovinezza (2015). The song sums up the complex emotional life of a retired conductor, played by Michael Caine, on vacation at a Fellini-esque spa in Switzerland. David Lang is the Paul Fromm Composer in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017.

Maestro Nicola Piovani, is one of Italy’s best-known composers of film scores, with over 130 film scores to his credit, including The Night of the Shooting Stars (1982), Kaos (1984), both directed by Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, and Federico Fellini’s Ginger e Fred (1986), Intervista (1987), and La voce della luna (1990). In 1998, Piovani won the Oscar for Best Original Dramatic Score for his work on Roberto Benigni’s celebrated film La vita è bella.

The event will be conducted in English and Italian with simultaneous translation in both languages.

The 2016-17 Conversations/Conversazioni series is sponsored by The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

Enrico Riley - Paintings and Drawings

  • Wednesday, 22 March 2017 - 6:30pm
Studio 201
Enrico Riley - Midnight, Hunting 1

Enrico Riley will give a general overview of his painting and drawing practice past to present. He is the Jules Guerin Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome and Associate Professor in the Department of Studio Art at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire.

The shoptalk will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

E.V. Day

  • Monday, 27 March 2017 - 6:30pm
Studio 127
E.V. Day - A still from video: Wanda's Heart

E.V. Day will discuss past, current and future projects she is exploring while at the American Academy. She is the Henry W. and Marian T. Mitchell / Miss Edith Bloom Fund Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome.

The shoptalk will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conversations/Conversazioni

Ian Hodder with Andrea Carandini - Archaeology Today

  • Tuesday, 28 March 2017 - 6:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

A conversation with world-renown archaeologist Ian Hodder, Dunlevie Family Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University and Italian archeologist and FAI president Andrea Carandini about the present and future of archaeology in the US and Europe, considering archaeology in theory and practice, heritage and politics, and the place of the past in a world of change.

The event will be held in English.

The 2016-17 Conversations/Conversazioni series is sponsored by The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

Danielle Simon - "Canta la radio!": Italian opera on the airwaves, 1925-1940

  • Wednesday, 29 March 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

The centrality of opera for early Italian radio cannot be overstated. In 1931, EIAR (the Ente Italiano Audizioni Radiofoniche) broadcast sixty-nine broadcasts of fifty-four complete operas, a rate that would continue to increase over the next several decades. But producers of opera confronted challenges when translating the genre from stage to airwaves, not least of which was the radio’s lack of image. Some viewed the radio as an opportunity to perform new operas featuring otherwise inaccessible interior voices; others saw broadcasts of nineteenth-century opera as nation-building tools for transmitting culture and italianità. This talk will explore the challenges and possibilities opera presented during the early decades of Italian radio broadcasting, at a time when the new medium seemed to offer endless frontiers to explore culture, identity, and the human.

Danielle Simon is the Millicent Mercer Johnsen Rome Prize Fellows in Modern Italian Studies at the American Academy in Rome and a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Music at the University of California, Berkeley.

The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conference

Renaissance Society of America (RSA)

  • Thursday, 30 March 2017 - 9:00am to Saturday, 1 April 2017 - 6:00pm
The Palmer House Hilton - Chicago
Detail of the Spada Chapel in San Girolamo della Carità, Rome

AAR-SOF will sponsor five panels at the Chicago 2017 meeting of the RSA. To attend please register at: http://www.rsa.org/page/2017Chicago

Reading the Symbols
30 March 2017, 10:30am-12:00pm
Palmer House Hilton, 7th floor, LaSalle 2

Reading the Symbols: Pathways in Renaissance Iconography
Chair: Marco Antonio Piana (McGill University)
During the Renaissance, the relationship between word and image was closely subordinated to specific cultural dynamics. The conception of iconography, tied to visual or textual archetypes, matured with the development of humanism, which introduced a new way of interpreting literary and material sources and provided new perspectives on the classical past. The aim of this panel is to analyze and discuss a range of sixteenth-century iconographies in order to better understand the intellectual dynamics behind their construction. Focus will fall on semantic shifts and innovative symbolism.

Thomism and Renaissance I
1 April 2017, 8:30am-10:am
Palmer House Hilton, 7th floor, Clark 10

Thomism and Renaissance II
1 April 2017, 10:30am-12:00pm 
Palmer House Hilton, 7th floor, Clark 10

Thomism and Renaissance
Chairs: Paul Richard Blum and Kent Emery
Two panels commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of Paul Oskar Kristeller's "Le Thomisme et la pensee italienne de la Renaissance" (1967) which argued the continuity, during the era of renaissance humanism, of philosophical positions and methods associated with medieval scholasticism. Each panel features an eminent senior historian of philosophy as respondent.

Chapels in Roman Churches I
1 April 2017, 1:30pm-3:00pm
Palmer House Hilton, 7th floor, Burnham 2

Chapels in Roman Churches II
1 April 2017, 3:30pm-5:00pm
Palmer House Hilton, 7th floor, Burnham 2

Chapels in Roman Churches between the Cinquecento and the Seicento: Form and Meaning
Chairs: Steve F. Ostrow (University of Minnesota, FAAR‘02) and Patrizia Tosini (Universita di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale)
Two panels on church interiors in the pre- and post-Tridentine era as complex sites for the elaborate self-representation of individuals, families, and social groups. Panelists present their historical, philological, and iconographic research to offer new insights about some of Rome's most venerable liturgical sites.