Events

Calendar

February 2017

Seminar

Modern Italian Studies Seminar - Jessica Marglin

  • Wednesday, 1 February 2017 - 5:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Gustave Le Gray, 'Bateaux quittant le port du Havre’, 1856.

In 2016, the British School at Rome and École française de Rome launched a Modern Italian History Seminar in Rome. To be hosted by the various Academies, the seminar’s aims are:

  • to bring together visiting and resident Italianists;

  • to develop a network of permanent academics within the city and Italy that will enable better connection with visiting scholars;

  • to further awareness of newly published and current research underway in Italy.

The American Academy in Rome will host the first session of the 2017 Modern Italian Studies Seminar, which brings together scholars in the city’s foreign schools to share and discuss work in progress. The session will be held on Wednesday 1 February at 5:30pm with a paper by Jessica Marglin, the National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies at the American Academy in Rome and Assistant Professor of Religion in the School of Religion at the University of Southern California. The title of the paper is “Nationality on Trial: International Private Law across the Nineteenth-Century Mediterranean.” The paper will be given in English.

For further information about the seminars, please contact:
Simon Martin, Research Fellow, British School at Rome. Email: simon.martin@bsrome.it
Fabrice Jesné, Directeur des études pour les Époques moderne et contemporaine, École française de Rome. Email: dirmod@efrome.it

Concert Series

Scharoun Ensemble Berlin

  • Saturday, 4 February 2017 - 8:30pm
  • Sunday, 5 February 2017 - 4:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome

The renowned Scharoun Ensemble of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra will offer two concerts to the AAR community and the city of Rome as the culminating events of a week-long residency. This will be the Scharoun Ensemble's ninth annual visit and concert series at the American Academy. They will perform a classical repertoire and a contemporary repertoire featuring music by current Rome Prize Fellows in Musical Composition Jonathan Berger and Christopher Trapani and Italian composer Giuliano Bracci.

4 February 2017 at 8:30pm
Music by Jonathan Berger and Arnold Schönberg 

5 February 2017 at 4pm
Music by Giuliano Bracci, Johannes Brahms and Christopher Trapani

Seats available on a first-come, first-served basis. You are kindly requested to take your seat 15 minutes before the beginning of the performance.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

Andrew Horne - Cicero, Horace, and the Bonds of Society

  • Monday, 6 February 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Description: What holds a community together? I propose to reconstruct two contrasting approaches to the social bond (vinculum societatis) that were developed in first-century BC Rome as the institutions of the Republic went to pieces. For Cicero, the social bond is virtue. The free decision of the citizens to practice justice underwrites all the institutions of the state, from private to religious to constitutional law. Horace, writing a decade after Cicero’s death, offers a different and a polemical answer: forgiveness. A society cannot be based on virtue, Horace argues, when virtue is impossible to guarantee. Better to found the state on human weakness than human strength. These two approaches to the social bond are attempts to grapple with the dissolving fabric of the Roman state. And behind both there is the fear that in fact nothing holds the citizens together but common institutions; and that when the institutions go, so will the state.

Andrew Horne is the Arthur Ross Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Classics at the University of Chicago.

The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Lecture

Jean-Louis Cohen - Memory Erased/Regained: Marseilles at War

  • Tuesday, 7 February 2017 - 6:00pm
British School at Rome - Via Antonio Gramsci 61
“The Marseille population witnesses the Nazi destruction of the Old Harbor area, January 1943.” Source: Bundesarchiv, Berlin

Published in 2011, Jean-Louis Cohen’s book Architecture in Uniform has recast the accepted vision that saw the Second Word War as an empty period for architecture. Cohen has instead highlighted the many ways it allowed for the victory of modernity. In this lecture, he will present his new research that assesses how these ideas hold true in the case of Marseilles during the Vichy regime and its aftermath.

The cold-blooded destruction of the centre of Marseilles by the Nazis in 1943 and the subsequent reconstruction of the city, which involved, among others, Fernand Pouillon and Le Corbusier, are vibrant episodes in which memory was mobilized in all its manifestations, from the collective, as discussed by Maurice Halbwachs in those years, to the most intimate.

Jean-Louis Cohen is the Louis Kahn Scholar in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017 and Sheldon H. Solow Professor in the History of Architecture at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University.

The lecture will be held in English.

The event is organized in collaboration with the British School at Rome and is part of their Architecture Programme: Meeting Architecture III: FRAGMENTS.

SHOPTALKS

Caroline Cheung - Storage and Packaging for an Empire: Agricultural Economies of West-Central Italy

  • Monday, 13 February 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

The emergence of Rome’s far-flung territorial empire resulted in a sophisticated regime for the storage and distribution of foodstuffs to feed the city of Rome. How did the orchestration of this colossal apparatus impact the people living in the shadow of the epicenter of a Mediterranean empire? This talk examines the storage and packaging containers for agricultural commodities in west-central Italy to study the artisans, skills, techniques, and organization of labor required to propel an imperial food supply.

Caroline Cheung is the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and a Ph.D. Candidate in the Graduate Group in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Exhibition

Cinque Mostre 2017 - Vision(s) :

  • Tuesday, 14 February 2017 - 6:00pm to 9:00pm
AAR Gallery
Rome

Cinque Mostre 2017 is an annual exhibition of work by current Rome Prize Fellows and invited artists curated by Ilaria Gianni with assistance from Saverio Severini.

Every Friday at 5pm, one or two artists participating in the exhibition Cinque Mostre 2017 - Vision(s) : will give brief presentations on their work.

February 24
Yasmin Vobis / Robert Hutchison (English)

March 3   
Phu Hoang / Rachely Rotem (English)
Saverio Verini (full tour, Italian)

March 10
Emiliano Maggi (Italian)
Stanislao Di Giugno (Italian)
Tomaso De Luca (Italian)
E.V. Day (6:00pm Wanda Video / 6:30pm In-Vitro, English)

March 17
Michael Queenland (English)
Kyle deCamp (English)

March 24
Jonathan Berger / Annalisa Metta (English)
Nicola Pecoraro (Italian)

March 31
Enrico Riley (English)
David Reinfurt (English)

OPENING HOURS
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 4pm–7pm
14 February–4 April 2017

Taking its cue from the multifaceted term “vision” and emphasizing its physical-perceptive, political, supernatural, and mystical aspects, VISION(S) : explores the strategies that artists and scholars employ to re-configure our view of the world. This exhibition brings together different approaches and “ways of seeing,” drawing inspiration from the present, facts from the past, and projections of the future. Employing various strategies, including translation, history, performance, poetry, fiction, and mysticism, the works challenge notions of culture, origin, and belonging. 

VISION(S) : offers an encounter between personal investigations of the creative process and the often compromised external gaze of the viewer. The show unfolds along a non-linear thread constantly challenging viewers’ desire to understand through seeing, in which works of art confound styles and genres. Each contribution acts as a unique apparition, in which the spectator is not just a bystander, but an operative participant in a new dimension, acting as observer and producer of visions. The resulting experiences are reminders of what John Berger describes in Ways of Seeing (1972) as “the relation between what we see and what we know is never settled,” unleashing a new process of searching for meaning, one that is imbued with imagination and awareness. Realism and its ordinary, pragmatic view of the world are overtaken by fantasy and prophecy, intuition and illusion. Authors and spectators are complicit in the fabrication of worlds through a different interpretation and construction of what appears to be real.

Participants are:
Gundam Air, Gregory Bailey, Cornelia Baltes, Elisabetta Benassi, Jonathan Berger, Kristi Cheramie, Caroline Cheung, Roberto Coda Zabetta, E.V. Day, Tomaso De Luca (in collaboration with Vincenzo Giannetti), Gabriele De Santis, Kyle deCamp, Stanislao Di Giugno, Sean Edwards, Hussein Fancy (collaboration with Accettella-Teatro Mongiovino), Aaron Forrest, Anna Franceschini, Piero Golia, Leon Grek, Grossi Maglioni, Isabell Heimerdinger, Robert Hutchison, Lauren Keeley, Jack Livings, Emiliano Maggi, Christoph Meinrenken, Annalisa Metta, Nicole Miller, MODU - Phu Hoang e Rachely Rotem, Jonathan Monk, Matthew Null, Luigi Ontani, Pino Pasquali, Nicola Pecoraro, Gianni Politi, Michael Queenland, David Reinfurt, Enrico Riley, Danielle Simon (in collaboration with Zazie Gnecchi Ruscone e G.A.N Made in Italy), Francis Upritchard, Alessandro Vizzini, Yasmin Vobis, Bedwyr Williams, Joseph Williams 

Performances on February 14:
7pm, Cryptoporticus - Il Cuore di Wanda (1931-2017), a first-ever live performance of the Futurist radiophonic opera, presented for the first time since its premiere in 1931.

8pm, Courtyard - Indoor City (2017), a project conceived by two architects, two writers, a historian, a music composer and a climate scientist.  
 

FINISSAGE
4 April 2017, 6pm–8pm
A reading of Howard Zinn, “A People’s History of the United States,” a project by Nicole Miller and Michael Queenland.

A performance of The Sicilian Vespers and the Tunisian Matins, a project by Hussein Fancy, in collaboration with Jonathan Berger, Caroline Cheung, Leon Grek, Enrico Riley, Joseph Williams and the Accettella-Teatro Mongiovino.

OPENING HOURS
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 4pm–7pm
14 February–4 April 2017
Guided visits every Friday. Please check website for times.
FIRST GUIDED VISIT ON FEBRUARY 24 AT 5PM - ROB HUTCHISON AND YASMIN VOBIS

The exhibition is made possible by the
Adele Chatfield-Taylor and John Guare Fund for the Arts.

The performances of Il Cuore di Wanda and the The Sicilian Vespers and the Tunisian Matins are made possible by the Fellow’s Project Fund of the American Academy in Rome.

Beer at the opening event offered by: untitled and Menabrea.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conference

College Art Association Annual Conference (CAA)

  • Thursday, 16 February 2017 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
New York Hilton Midtown
New York
Meyer Shapiro, Umayyad Palace, Amman, Jordan; 1927; Meyer Schapiro Collection; Box 644, Folder 14; Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

The American Academy in Rome is pleased to host a roundtable panel session at the 2017 College Art Association (CAA) Annual Conference in New York, "The American Dream of the Mediterranean: Lessons from History," on Thursday, February 16.

Described as “the Middle Sea” or even “the Great Sea,” the Mediterranean has long been celebrated for its centrality and significance as a crossroads of everything from foodstuffs and people to religion, culture, and economic power. In the twentieth century, the Mediterranean took on a new role as a classroom of unrivaled riches for a generation of young scholars who later defined the discipline of art history in the United States. Whether working on the arts of Islam and Byzantium, Medieval France, or Early Modern Italy, the pioneers of art and architecture who took up positions at leading American universities and museums -- including Shelomo Dov Goitein, Richard Krautheimer, Meyer Schapiro, Robert Venturi and Kurt Weitzmann -- developed their methods and theories during formative travels along the shores of the Mediterranean.  

Taking a fresh approach to the conference session format, this roundtable brings together scholars in varied fields to discuss the lessons from the Mediterranean that have informed how we see, analyze, and think about art from the origins of art history to today. As many of the art historical trailblazers considered came as refugees to the United States, where they made their careers, this panel also questions what claims can be made, if any, about an “American” style of art history. This session is organized by the American Academy in Rome as part of its 2016-17 programming series, American Classics, which investigates both the classical underpinnings of American culture and the “classic” texts, works of art and ideals that have helped define American identity.

Session Chairs:
Lindsay Harris (FAAR'14), Andrew W. Mellon Professor in Charge of the School of Classical Studies, American Academy in Rome
Avinoam Shalem (RAAR'15), Riggio Professor of the History of the Arts of Islam, Columbia University

Session Participants:
Dale Kinney (FAAR,'72, RAAR'97), Eugenia Chase Guild Professor Emeritus in the Humanities and Research Professor, Bryn Mawr College
Peter N. Miller, Dean, Professor of History of the Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean, Bard Graduate Center
Martino Stierli, Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, Museum of Modern Art

Panel Session Information:
Date and Time:
Thursday, Februrary 16, 5:30-7:00 pm

Location:
New York Hilton Midtown
Beekman Parlor

To attend the session, please register for CAA at http://conference.collegeart.org/registration/individual-registration/

SHOPTALKS

Robert Clines - The Converting Sea: Wrestling with Crisis and Change in the Early Modern Mediterranean World

  • Monday, 20 February 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Rather than seeing the Mediterranean solely as a physical space, Robert Clines will discuss the Mediterranean as an intellectual space in which historical actors negotiated challenges to traditional notions of religion, politics, and culture, which resulted in an early modern Mediterranean world in crisis: the shifting commercial and geopolitical landscape of the Mediterranean; cross-cultural exchanges and conflicts; reconciling new forms of learning with past traditions in an attempt to unpack the complexities of the present. The talk will cover past projects as well as ongoing and future ones.

Robert Clines is the Jesse Howard Jr. / Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies at the American Academy in Rome and Assistant Professor in the History Department at Western Carolina University, North Carolina.

The shoptalk will be held in English. 

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

Silvia Armando - “L’Oriente è paese dalle molte vite e dalle molte storie.” Ugo Monneret de Villard and the Art and Archaeology of the Medieval World in the First Half of the 20th Century

  • Wednesday, 22 February 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Ugo Monneret de Villard (Milan 1881-Rome 1954) devoted his life to the study of artistic interchange between the Christian and Islamic cultures of the medieval world. Born in a recently-unified Italy, his life and career were set against the backdrop of historical events and disruptions, such as the two world wars and the rise and fall of the Fascist regime. Monneret’s multi-faceted profile will be outlined based on unpublished documents and correspondence, as well as on the critical analysis of his extensive publications. The life, work and travels of this eclectic scholar, illustrated by his extraordinary photographic archives, will thus become a lens on Italian cultural history, among nationalism, colonialism and Orientalism.

Silvia Armando is the Italian Fellow in Medieval Studies at the American Academy in Rome. 

The shoptalk will be held in English. 

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conference

Projecting Americanism Abroad: Italy in the Cold War

  • Monday, 27 February 2017 - 9:00am to 4:30pm
  • Tuesday, 28 February 2017 - 9:30am to 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Image from "Paisan", Roberto Rossellini (1946)

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

Exploring the Italian-American relationship during the Cold War, Projecting Americanism Abroad, raises new questions with regard to Italy, a vital front in the conflict that has been much neglected. Geography made Italy a critical front in the international conflict. Italy’s borders, directly facing Tito’s Yugoslavia, placed the peninsula at the intersection of East and West; of the free market and communism; of atheism and Christianity. The rise of communism there would have profound repercussions on the Middle East and the future of oil; and it would deny the United States and NATO the use of Italy as a major site for military bases essential for the strategy of deterrence. Rome also possessed a unique cultural and religious importance whose resonance was especially strong because of the history of immigration. The State Department, the CIA, the American labor movement, and the embassy intervened massively in Italian internal affairs through such measures as economic assistance, cultural diplomacy, subsidies to friendly political parties, and extensive covert action. The conference will take a multidisciplinary and international look at  Americanism and its impact on nuclear policy, science, the trade union movement, architecture, film, jazz, literature, music, photography, and cultural diplomacy. 

All talks will be in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

Organizers: Martin Brody, Wellesley College, and Frank Snowden, Yale University

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.