Events

Ongoing

Ongoing

Translating Poetry: Readings and Conversations (3-4 May 2012)

Villa Aurelia
Rome

A two-day series of readings and conversations held 3-4 May 2012 exploring current approaches to translating Polish and Italian poetry into English, and the translation of English-language poetry into Italian.

William B. Hart Poet-in-Residence Robert Hass, the leading American translator of Polish Nobel Laureate poet Czesław Miłosz, was joined by Polish poets Julia Hartwig and Adam Zagajewski and American translator Clare Cavanagh in a bilingual reading and discussion (in English) of work by poets including Hartwig, Miłosz, Zbigniew Herbert, Wisława Szymborska, and Zagajewski.

The second day's events were based on Geoffrey Brock's new anthology The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Italian Poetry (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012). Italian poets included Edoardo Albinati, Antonella Anedda, Franco Buffoni, Patrizia Cavalli, Franco Loi, Valerio Magrelli, Lucio Mariani, Maria Luisa Spaziani, and AAR Italian Affiliated Fellows Massimo Gezzi and Guido Mazzoni read from their own work, as well as from work by poets including D'Annunzio, Montale, Pavese, Pasolini, Saba, Ungaretti, and Zanzotto. English translations were read by translators including Damiano Abeni, Sarah Arvio, FAAR '04, Geoffrey Brock, Moira Egan, Jamie McKendrick, Anthony Molino and Susan Stewart; Jennifer Scappettone, FAAR '11, read from her translations of Amelia Rosselli. There was also a bilingual reading of poems by Byron, Donne, Anne Carson, Seamus Heaney, Keats, Shakespeare and others as they have been translated by Italian poets, and public conversations, both about translating from Italian into English and about translating from English into Italian.

Video Highlights from the event can be viewed below:

Modern and Contemporary Polish Poetry in English Translation

Modern and Contemporary Italian Poetry in English Translation

English and American Poetry in Italian Translation

Ongoing

Conversations That Matter' Lecture Series: Italy Today - Politics, Culture, and the Economy (18 April, 2012)

Villa Aurelia
Rome

Conversations That Matter is a series of public programs that builds on the innovative but often-specialized work that takes place in the studies, studios, lecture hall, library, and auditorium of the American Academy in Rome. The series invites participants to communicate the general relevancy of their work to an audience that reaches beyond the scholarly and artistic fields of the American Academy. The aim of the program is to engage a diverse external audience in the Academy’s ongoing scholarly and creative dialogue.

This edition of Conversations That Matter features a discussion on the top political, cultural, and economic challenges currently facing Italy.
American Academy in Rome Director Christopher S. Celenza, FAAR’94, leads the discussion. Scheduled panelists include:
   ~ Rachel Donadio, Rome Bureau Chief of The New York Times, responsible for Italy, the Vatican, and the broader southern Mediterranean
   ~ Miguel Gotor, Professor of Modern History at the University of Turin and editorialist for la Repubblica
   ~ David I. Kertzer, RAAR’00, Paul Dupee, Jr. University Professor of Social Science at Brown University (an authority on Italian history, politics, society, and demographics)
   ~ Sylvia Poggioli, Senior European Correspondent for the foreign desk of National Public Radio (NPR), covering news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe, and the Balkans.

You can view selected highlights from the event here.

Ongoing

Conversations That Matter' Lecture Series: The Legacy of the Roman and Mediterranean Past - How Relevant for Contemporary Design? (7 December, 2011)

Villa Aurelia
Rome

 

The December 2011 conference entitled "Paradigm and Progeny: Roman Imperial Architecture and its Legacy" concluded with an installment of the Academy series Conversations That Matter, moderated by American Academy in Rome Director Christopher S. Celenza, FAAR’94, and John Pinto. Participants included Laurie Olin, FAAR'74, RAAR'90,'08, landscape architect and partner at OLIN in Philadelphia; Frederick Fisher, FAAR'08, architect and partner at Frederick Fisher and Partners in Los Angeles; and Stephen Kieran, FAAR'81, architect and partner at KieranTimberlake in Philadelphia. The Conversation focused on how contemporary architects and designers have been inspired by the classical past and how that inspiration is reflected in their work.

You can view the full Conversation below:

Ongoing

Conversations That Matter' Lecture Series: Saving Cultural Heritage in Crisis Areas, What Will Really Work? (5 November, 2011)

Villa Aurelia
Rome

On Friday 4 and Saturday 5 November 2011, a comprehensive conference entitled Saving Cultural Heritage in Crisis Areas was held at the American Academy’s splendid 17th century Villa Aurelia with the intent of highlighting the work of a dozen internationally renowned scholars of cultural heritage and cultural property. Their common thread? Highly effective preservation work in zones that faced extreme challenges, whether by conflict, natural disaster, or toxic bureaucracy.

The conference culminated in a lively installment of the Academy’s Conversations that Matter, moderated by AAR Director Christopher S. Celenza, FAAR'94, with Mounir Bouchenaki (Director-General, ICCROM, Rome), C. Brian Rose, FAAR'92, and Laurie Rush, FAAR'11 as featured participants. The 90-minute discussion appears in its entirety below.

 

Ongoing

Composer Paul Rudy Absorbs Sounds of Rome in New Composition

American Academy in Rome
Rome

This year [2011], Kansas City composer Paul Rudy, also a professor at the UMKC Conservatory of Music and Dance, was awarded the Elliot Carter Rome Prize Fellowship. He's been in Rome since the fall. And like many composers before him, Rudy has found a special compositional voice in Rome. Reporter Anna Celenza has caught up with Paul Rudy in Rome, and sent us this report. Rudy returns to Kansas City in August."

-KCUR-FM Public Radio, Kansas City, MO

Listen Now

Ongoing

Conversations That Matter' Lecture Series: Cosmopolitanism (28 May, 2011)

American Academy in Rome
Rome

On Saturday 28 May 2011 the American Academy in Rome hosted a public program on “Cosmopolitanism” in its Conversations That Matter series. AAR Director Christopher S. Celenza,FAAR'94 moderated a wide-ranging discussion that highlighted six current Rome Prize recipients from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Featured in this Conversation are 2011 Academy Fellows Seth Bernard, Stephanie Malia Hom, Ersela Kripa, Stephen Mueller, Stéphanie Nadalo, and Barbara Naddeo, as well as Director Christopher Celenza. Here is a short (5 minute) introduction to the 75 minute program.

Ongoing

Galileo's 400th on the Gianicolo: American Academy in Rome Celebrations (April 2011)

Casa Rustica & Bass Garden
Rome

The American Academy's Casa Rustica (in the present Bass Garden) occupies the precise site where, on Thursday 14 April 1611, Galileo made his first demonstration to a learned audience in Rome of his new invention, named on this occasion as the "telescope". To mark the 400th anniversary of this historic achievement, the Academy staged a Conversation on science and faith moderated by Director Christopher S. Celenza (7 April 2011), an exhibition of astronomical instruments from the collection of the Specola Vaticana (7-15 April), and a multimedia "Galileo Cabaret" on the significant date (Thursday 14 April 2011). Finmeccanica generously provided financial support for all of these events. Vittorio Ferrara produced this highlights video.

Ongoing

The Gatteschi Collection: Ancient Rome as Reconstructed in the Photographs of Giuseppe Gatteschi

American Academy in Rome Photo Archive

The Gatteschi Collection

The Image of Rome that emerges from an examination of the work of Giuseppe Gatteschi takes shape gradually, coming together little by little from different planes of vision. Ancient Rome is “restored” in the archaeologist’s meticulous drawings accompanied by photographs of places that have been destroyed or rendered unrecognizable, unrealized projects juxtaposed with urban designs solidified over time, oft-obscure documents next to well-known monuments. Gradually we arrive at an understanding of how Gatteschi’s original comparison between “restoration drawings” and “photographs of the current state of the monuments”, as developed from the end of the 19th century to the end 1930s, has relevance in our own times, in an era of even stronger contradictions and antagonisms between conservation and modernity. The materials in the Gatteschi collection at the American Academy in Rome bear witness to fervent research and extensive reflection on the reconstruction of monuments and ancient topography. The complex articulation of the architectural and topographical plans contrast with the stereotypical linearity of the architectural reconstructions, drawn by various hands but all conceived by Gatteschi on the basis of Rodolfo Lanciani’s topographical interpretations. They reveal the intrinsic difficulty of his enterprise, which was greatly appreciated by his contemporaries but fatally challenged by subsequent archaeological research.

Ongoing

X LOCUS: Conversation Poem

American Academy in Rome
Rome

On April 28 and 29, 2011, a public of over 100 saw the cortile of the McKim, Mead and White Building at the American Academy in Rome transformed by a collaborative installation entitled X LOCUS.

X LOCUS featured environmental media by Founders Rome Prize Fellows in Architecture Ersela Kripa and Stephen Mueller, sound by Elliott Carter Rome Prize Fellow in Musical Composition Paul Rudy, and lyrics by Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies Jennifer Scappettone. The installation, a creation of four 2010-2011 AAR Fellows, was on display in the cortile of the McKim, Mead & White building over the course of two evenings, April 28-29, 2011.

A conversation-poem on national, cultural, linguistic and psychological dislocation created by Jennifer Scappettone—installed in the gravelly space inside a moat of liquid loggia projections and sculpted ambient fountain/fowl for X Locus, a collaboration between Scappettone, Paul Rudy, and Stephen Mueller and Ersela Kripa (AGENCY Architecture), held at the courtyard of the American Academy in Rome on April 27-28, 2011.

The sound poem is constructed of interweaving movements approaching the history and actuality of this courtyard, shaped by Columbian Exposition architects McKim, Mead, & White in 1913, lined with playfully pastiched funerary inscriptions within an Academy of national designation on the Janiculum Hill, just inside the Aurelian Walls of historical Rome, traversed below by Trajan’s Aqueduct.

In this hybrid neighborhood contoured by the Wall and a sequence of raucous gates, the designations “American” and “Italian” are both housed and continually recast as a looping sequence of never quite arrived-at aspirations, disappointments, researches and desires.

Thanks to the voices of the AAR community—chefs, scholars, architects, composers, poets, baristas, a singer, a sculptor, a painter and installation artist, a filmmaker, a doctor, and various others eluding definition—for the sought and found material of their cherished voices.

Ongoing

Conversations That Matter' Lecture Series: Faith and Science (7 April, 2011)

American Academy in Rome
Rome

On Thursday 7 April 2011 the American Academy in Rome hosted a public program on “Science and Faith” in its Conversations That Matter series. Academy Director Christopher S. Celenza, FAAR’94 (pictured above at left) discussed the interrelationship between scientific and religious inquiry with bestselling author Brother Guy Consolmagno, SJ, astronomer at the Vatican Observatory (Specola Vaticana). You can view the entire conversation below.

This was the first event in a week-long celebration of the 400th anniversary of Galileo's demonstration and naming of the "telescope" on Rome's Gianicolo hill (14 April 1611), on what is now the grounds of the American Academy.

Ongoing

Conversations That Matter' Lecture Series: The Future of News in the Digital World (27 July, 2010)

American Academy in Rome
Rome

On Tuesday 27 July 2010 the American Academy in Rome and NPR (National Public Radio) co-hosted a public program on “The Future of News in the Digital World.” Academy Director Christopher Celenza (FAAR’94) moderated a discussion between Vivian Schiller, President and CEO of NPR, and Sylvia Poggioli, NPR Senior European Correspondent.

The event was live streamed Tuesday 27 July at 6 PM Rome time, with an email forum for questions, that allowed for participation from audiences globally. The program runs for approximately 72 minutes.