Events

Calendar

October 2018

Talk

Peter Benson Miller – Painting in the “Contact Zone”: Artists at the Postwar American Academy in Rome

  • Monday, 1 October 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Philip Guston, “The Tormentors,” 1947–48, oil on canvas, 40⅞ in. x 60½ in. (103.84 cm x 153.67 cm). San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (artwork © Estate of Philip Guston)

In the years immediately following the Second World War, Rome was a productive workplace for American artists and intellectuals. According to the internationally minded Italian artist Piero Dorazio, one of the founders of the group Forma 1, “Rome was like Paris, it had become the navel of art in Europe. Americans were no longer going to Paris—that had been in the twenties and thirties.” The image of Rome as a “second Paris” was also broadcast in 1952 by an article in Life entitled “Americans in Italy,” which declared that “at the end of World War II artists from all over the U.S. began to head for Italy where, for the past six years, they have swarmed the hillsides and made Rome the rival of Paris as art headquarters.”

Awed by historical grandeur and artistic forebears in Italy, American artists also encountered a complex contemporary art world of entangled Cold War cultural politics, ideological struggles, and aesthetic debates. This talk will reconsider several American artists who worked at the American Academy in Rome in this period—focusing in particular on Philip Guston—foregrounding the challenges of painting in what cultural historian Mary Louise Pratt has termed a “contact zone.”

Peter Benson Miller is the Andrew Heiskell Arts Director at the American Academy in Rome. He curated Philip Guston, Roma, which was held at the Museo Carlo Bilotti - Aranciera di Villa Borghese, Rome and traveled to the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC. At the Academy, his exhibitions include: Cy Twombly, Photographer (2015); Studio Systems (2016); Charles Ray, Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog (2017); Yto Barrada, The Dye Garden (2018); and the upcoming Paolo Gioli: Anthropolaroid. He is the editor of Go Figure! New Perspectives on Guston, published in 2015 by New York Review Books and the American Academy in Rome.

The event will be held in English. Watch the livestream at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Talk

Lynne Lancaster – My Rome: A Long-Term Relationship with the Eternal City

  • Monday, 8 October 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Lynne Lancaster, December 2009

Lynne C. Lancaster will speak about the ways in which her time in Rome over a thirty-year period has affected the trajectory of her research on Roman architecture.

Lynne C. Lancaster (Fellow 2002)  is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor-in-Charge of the Humanities. She is the author of Concrete Vaulted Construction in Imperial Rome, Innovations in Context (2005) and Innovative Vaulted Construction in the Architecture of the Roman Empire, 1st to 4th centuries CE (2015) as well as articles on the Colosseum, Trajan’s Column, and Trajan’s Markets. She studied architecture at Virginia Tech (BArch) and classical archaeology at Oxford University (MPhil, DPhil).

The event will be held in English. Watch the livestream at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conversations/Conversazioni

Paolo Gioli and Roberta Valtorta

  • Thursday, 11 October 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: The Body.

To inaugurate the exhibition Paolo Gioli: Anthropolaroid, the artist will speak about his work in conversation with photography critic and historian Roberta Valtorta.

One of the most respected specialists in Italian photography, Valtorta has collaborated with Gioli for many years. In 1996, Valtorta curated the retrospective dedicated to Gioli’s work held at the Palazzo degli Esposizioni in Rome. Most recently, she contributed an essay to the volume Paolo Gioli, Etruschi Polaroid 1984, published this year by Humboldt Books. Together, artist and critic will consider Gioli’s representations of the human body, his contemporary dialogue with classical antiquity, and his experimental approach to the Polaroid medium.

Paolo Gioli is the Richard Grubman and Caroline Mortimer Photographer-in-Residence at the American Academy in Rome for 2018-19.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Exhibition

Paolo Gioli: Anthropolaroid

  • Thursday, 11 October 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
AAR Gallery
Rome
Paolo Gioli, “Torace,” 2007, Polaroid 20×24 and Polaroid transfer print on silk, 21¾ x 27½ in. (55.5 x 70 cm). Collection of Paolo Vampa (artwork © Paolo Gioli)

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: The Body.

The Italian artist Paolo Gioli (1942– ), who studied painting and the nude at the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Venice, has long been preoccupied with the human body. Like his experimental films, which establish “an essential analogy between celluloid and skin as the sensitive interface between the self and the outside world,” Gioli’s Polaroid transfers use the body and its fragments as a means to interrogate photography’s history and theoretical foundations, as well as its dialogue with cinema, printmaking, sculpture, and painting.

After spending a year in New York in the late 1960s, Gioli was among the first artists to master Polaroid transfers following the introduction of SX-70 instant film in 1972. Since then, he has produced a wide range of formally complex works with the gelatin and dye layers of Polaroid emulsion. Using handmade pinhole cameras and alternative paper and silk supports, Gioli marries the most elemental procedures of early photography to a sophisticated use of the one-step film created by Edwin Land, cofounder of the Polaroid Corporation. Among the many fruitful paradoxes of Gioli’s work is the way he creates timeless images by condensing a vast iconography into a spontaneous set of dexterous operations with instant film.

This exhibition, part of a series of public events at the American Academy in Rome during 2018–19 exploring the body as a site of subjectivity and meaning from antiquity to the present, features a selection of Gioli’s Polaroid transfers. Titled Anthropolaroid, it demonstrates not only the artist’s technical virtuosity with the medium, but also his profound meditations upon the human form and the fractured body politic. The accompanying, fully illustrated catalogue includes a text informed by a new interview with Gioli about his work and aspects of his process, as well as the artist’s essay “Anthropolaroid,” published in Italian in 1979 and translated into English here for the first time.

The exhibition is curated by Peter Benson Miller, Andrew Heiskell Arts Director at the American Academy in Rome. Miller is also editor of the catalogue. Paolo Gioli is the Richard Grubman and Caroline Mortimer Photographer-in-Residence at the American Academy in Rome for 201819.

The exhibition is on view from October 11 to December 9, 2018, Friday through Sunday, 4:00–7:00pm.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Fellow Shoptalks

Joannie Bottkol - Conserving Collections: Recognizing Layers of Narrative; Jim Carter - Gender in Olivetti History

  • Monday, 15 October 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Joannie Bottkol
Conserving Collections: Recognizing Layers of Narrative
Conservation treatments, which are tied to a specific period of significance, are often limited in the narrative they tell. Sometimes, however, an object holds other important stories, which could or should be acknowledged. This talk presents three case studies in which a conservation intervention has broadened the narratives being told about a work or site, thereby expanding our knowledge and enriching our understanding of the piece.

Joannie Bottkol is the Booth Family Rome Prize Fellow in Historic Preservation and Conservation and Conservator at the Historic Architecture, Conservation, and Engineering Center in the Northeast Region of the National Park Service.

Jim Carter
Gender in Olivetti History
The success of the Olivetti typewriter company owes a lot to the labor of women workers, as it does to the commercialization of gendered images. This talk asks why scholars of Olivetti have ignored such apparent details and looks to factory photographs and company advertisements in an attempt to recuperate some of this history.

Jim Carter is the Marian and Andrew Heiskell Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and PhD candidate in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Michigan.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Symposium

Designing Water

  • Wednesday, 17 October 2018 - 3:00pm to Thursday, 18 October 2018 - 9:00pm
Longwood Gardens
Kennett Square, Pennsylvania

Organized by the American Academy in Rome and Longwood Gardens, Designing Water is a two-day symposium that explores the relationship of design and water across time, space, and scale. Created for professionals involved in the designing, planning, and managing of water systems, Designing Water brings together academic leaders and world-renowned design practitioners from Asia, Europe, and North America. Each presenter will bring their local perspectives to truly global interests and concerns—such as ecology, aesthetics, meaning, and public space—as they assemble at Longwood Gardens in the picturesque Brandywine Valley, immediately preceding the 2018 annual meeting of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) in Philadelphia. Information and details on sessions, speakers, and registration can be found at designingwater.org.

Among the confirmed speakers at Designing Water are Julia Czerniak, Professor and Associate Dean, Syracuse Architecture (and chief curator of Designing Water), and several Rome Prize Fellows, including Anita Berrizbeitia (2006), Mary Margaret Jones (1998), Catherine Seavitt Nordenson (1998), and Charles Waldheim (2007).

Talk

Rome Prize Information Session

  • Saturday, 20 October 2018 - 4:30pm
University of Pennsylvania School of Design
Philadelphia
Mark Robbins, AAR president and CEO, welcomes the 2018–19 Rome Prize Fellows

The American Academy in Rome, in conjunction with PennDesign, invites you to an information session on the 2019 Rome Prize Fellowships. Mark Robbins, AAR president and CEO, will lead a discussion on the prize and the Academy with past Rome Prize winners. A short Q&A will follow.

The American Academy in Rome supports innovative artists, writers, and scholars living and working together in a dynamic international community. Each year, the Academy awards the Rome Prize to thirty emerging artists and scholars who represent the highest standard of excellence and who are in the early or middle stages of their working lives. The winners are invited to Rome to pursue their work in an atmosphere conducive to intellectual and artistic experimentation and interdisciplinary exchange. The Rome Prize consists of room and board, a stipend ($28,000 for full-term fellowships and $16,000 for half-term fellowships), individual work space, and privileged access to Rome.

The deadline for the national Rome Prize competition is Thursday, November 1, 2018. Applications will also be accepted between November 2 and 15 for an additional fee.

This event is free and open to the public; an RSVP, however is required.

 

 

For additional information, please contact Shawn Miller at s.miller@aarome.org or 212-751-7200, ext. 344.

Fellow Shoptalks

Ila Bêka and Eric Kondratieff

  • Monday, 22 October 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Ila Bêka
Bêka & Lemoine
Ila Bêka will discuss making films about the relationship between people and space. He will show extracts from among the twenty films that he and his partner, Louise Lemoine, have produced. Bêka summarizes his work in the following quote by Winston Churchill: “We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us.”

Ila Bêka is the Enel Foundation Italian Fellow in Architecture, Urban Design, and Landscape Architecture and founder of BÊKA & LEMOINE in Rome and Paris.

Eric Kondratieff
“One man’s villain is another man’s hero”: the ancient traveler’s experience of Augustan monuments on the via Flaminia.
This presentation will attempt to use numismatic, topographic, and archaeological evidence to recover, reconstruct, and contextualize the Augustan monumental program on the Via Flaminia in historical, iconographic, and ideological terms. It will then offer a brief hypothesis for its possible relation to Augustus' colonization efforts in central Italy, and its potential impact on those inhabiting the landscape as well as on travelers absorbing the evolving image of Augustus himself.

Eric Kondratieff is the Andrew Heiskell Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and Associate Professor in the Department of History at Western Kentucky University.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Film Screening and Conversation

Patrick Rumble – Free Films Made Freely: The Experimental Films of Paolo Gioli

  • Tuesday, 23 October 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Paolo Gioli, Piccolo film decomposto, 1986, film still.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: The Body.

Paolo Gioli’s Polaroid transfers, featured in the current exhibition at the American Academy in Rome, are inextricably linked to his output as one of Italy’s most innovative experimental filmmakers. One of the last remaining artists still making film on celluloid, Gioli employs a deconstructive attitude toward motion picture technology and its consumerist culture. Probing the productive dialogue between cinema and photography, Gioli explores the possibilities of these intertwined media with pinhole and camera obscura devices. The results, whether in the form of still or moving images, foreground the human body, desire, and the physical and psychological processes involved in sense perception.

Patrick Rumble, who has called Gioli “the last of the first filmmakers,” is a professor in the Departments of French and Italian, European Studies, and Visual Culture at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. A regular contributor to Artforum magazine, he is the editor of the three DVD box-set Paolo Gioli: The Complete Filmworks (Raro Video USA, 2016).

On this occasion, Rumble will present a selection of the artist’s films ranging in date from 1979 to 2013, discussing the relationship between photography and cinema in Gioli’s work.

The event will be held in Italian and English. 

This screening is held in conjunction with Videocittà, a series of events focusing on cinema and the audiovisual taking place at various venues throughout the city of Rome during the Festival del Cinema from 19 to 28 October 2018.

Paolo Gioli is the Richard Grubman and Caroline Mortimer Photographer-in-Residence at the American Academy in Rome for 2018–19.

The exhibition Paolo Gioli: Anthropolaroid remains on view through 9 December 2018, Friday through Sunday, 4pm - 7pm. On October 23, the exhibition will also be open from 5pm - 8pm.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

 
Conversations/Conversazioni

The Body: Out Front/Hidden/Abstracted

  • Thursday, 25 October 2018 - 6:30pm
Museum of Arts and Design
New York

The Body: Out Front/Hidden/Abstracted
Thursday, October 25, 6:30 PM
Museum of Art and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY

Please join us in New York City as we kick off the 2018–19 season of Conversations | Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome, featuring a panel discussion between the choreographer and dancer Molissa Fenley, the theater and puppet artist Dan Hurlin, and the performance and installation artist Pat Oleszko as they discuss various ways the body is used for expression in performance-based art. Moderating the discussion will be Martin Wechsler, programming consultant for the Joyce Theater.

Dan Hurlin
Theater and Puppet Artist, Sarah Lawrence College (2014 Fellow)

Molissa Fenley
Artistic Director, Molissa Fenley and Company (2008 Fellow)

Pat Oleszko
Artist (1999 Fellow, 2003 Resident)

Martin Wechsler
Moderator, The Joyce Theater, New York

This event is free and open to the public; an RSVP, however is required.

 

 

For additional information, please contact Shawn Miller at s.miller@aarome.org or 212-751-7200, ext. 344.

If you're unable to attend the event, please catch the livestreaming of the program at https://livestream.com/aarome/events/8425884

Fellow Shoptalks

Denis Robichaud and Basil Twist

  • Monday, 29 October 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Denis Robichaud
A Halloween Mask for Socrates: on Socrates in the Italian Renaissance
Despite his never writing a word for posterity, the influence of Socrates has extended far beyond his Athenian conversational partners. Just as a myriad of philosophers have seen themselves in the image of Socrates, they in turn have shaped Socrates into their own image. Denis Robichaud will discuss how Marsilio Ficino (1433-99) revived Platonism in the Italian Renaissance and decisively transformed how the figure of Socrates was understood.

Denis Robichaud is the Phyllis W. G. Gordan/National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and Associate Professor in the Program of Liberal Studies at the University of Notre Dame.

Basil Twist
The Sacred and Sensual Roots of Puppetry
Basil Twist will talk about his explorations in and around the phenomenon of puppetry; between abstraction and representation, animism and fetichism. He'll talk about his project here in Rome and resonances he is finding with post-war Italian visual artists. He'll also demonstrate some simple acts of animation.

Basil Twist is the Jesse Howard, Jr./Henry W. and Marian T. Mitchell Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and Artistic Director at Dream Music Puppetry Program, HERE Arts Center.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.