Calendar

May 2019

Fellow Shoptalks

Shoptalk – Nicolás Leong and Virginia Virilli

  • Monday, 6 May 2019 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Nicolás Leong
Recent Work, in Context

The Los Angeles–based artist Nicolás Leong will discuss his recent photographic explorations in and around Rome, and how they relate to his previous and ongoing efforts to picture the world.

Leong is the Abigail Cohen Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts.

Virginia Virilli
Women

The Rome-based writer Virginia Virilli will read extracts from her book Le ossa del Gabibbo (Feltrinelli, 2012) and from her theater plays to show how a recurring theme, “woman” in this case, is frequently growing along with the author.

Virilli is the Italian Fellow in literature.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Watch this event live at https://livestream.com/aarome.

A valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Patricia H. Labalme Friends of the Library Lecture

Thomas Carpenter - In Pursuit of the God Dionysos in Ancient Apulia

  • Wednesday, 8 May 2019 - 6:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome

Traditional views in the past have assumed that Apulian figure-decorated pottery was made primarily by and for the colonial Greeks in Taranto, but recent research has shown that the local Italic (non-Greek) people of Apulia provided principal markets. In this lecture, Thomas Carpenter will demonstrate how those local people adopted and modified Greek imagery of Dionysos, the god of wine and theater, for their own purposes and viewed him as a guide to the underworld and a blessed afterlife.

Trained as a classical archaeologist, Thomas Carpenter holds degrees from Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University and Oxford University and is an expert in ancient Greek religion and iconography. He has published numerous books and articles, one of which, his Art and Myth in Ancient Greece, has been translated into six languages. His recent work has focused on the Italic people of 4th Century BCE Italy, and he recently co-edited the first book in English to focus on these people, The Italic People of Ancient Apulia: New Evidence from Pottery for Workshops, Markets and Customs (Cambridge, 2014). Carpenter is Charles J. Ping Professor of Humanities and Distinguished Professor of Classics Emeritus at Ohio University. 

The event will be held in English. You can watch this event live at https://livestream.com/aarome.

A valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Tour

Open House Roma

  • Saturday, 11 May 2019 - 3:00pm to 6:00pm
McKim, Mead & White Building
Rome

The American Academy in Rome will be participating in the eighth edition of Open House Roma and will offer guided tours in Italian of the McKim, Mead & White Building, including the Cortile, Arthur and Janet C. Ross Library, and Bass Garden.

Tours are free of charge and registration is required. The registration site will open on April 24, 2019.

A valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

 

Performance

Tom Johnson/Adrienne Kennedy – Life Clings Closest Where Most Hated

  • Tuesday, 14 May 2019 - 6:00pm
AAR Cryptoporticus
Rome
Visual study for Lives Clings Closest Where Most Hated, using page 1 of Kennedy's Frankenstein notebook and a photo of ice build-up on a US Coast Guard cutter from the Northern Greenland Patrol during World War Two. Tom Johnson, 2019.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: The Body.

Life Clings Closest Where Most Hated
A performance by Tom Johnson based on Adrienne Kennedy's notes on Frankenstein.

The American Academy in Rome is proud to present the international debut of this collaboration between celebrated playwright Adrienne Kennedy and Turin based American artist Tom Johnson. Inspired by Kennedy’s reading of Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein – a landmark in the development of modern notions about the body, difference, and social alienation – Johnson has created an installation and performance expressly for the exhibition The Academic Body, which opens on May 22.

Adrienne Kennedy, who was inducted into the Theater Hall of Fame in 2018, has explored issues of race, kinship, and violence in American society in plays such as Funny House of a Negro, A Movie Star Has to Star in Black and White, and The Alexander Plays. Kennedy draws on mythical, historical, and imaginary figures to delve into the African-American experience. As Hilton Als has written in the New Yorker, Kennedy’s women of color “stand on the precipice of disaster, madness or loss.” Funnyhouse of a Negro, which Kennedy completed while living in Rome in 1961, after traveling through Europe and West Africa, premiered in New York and won an Obie Award in 1964. Her distinctive voice was immediately recognized as one of the boldest and most incisive in American theater.

Johnson, whose work encompasses drawing, sculpture, video, and live performance, has explored many of the themes central to Kennedy’s plays. The artist states: "I am interested in analyzing some social taboos, not because I am so brave and strong but because I feel oppressed by them and can imagine that there is a better way to feel. My strategy is very simple. I analyze certain phenomena (racism, the male “gaze”, the psychology of wealth) because I find them in myself."

The event is made possible by the Roy Lichtenstein Artist in Residence Fund, the Robert Mapplethorpe Photographer in Residence Fund and the Terra Foundation for American Art. 

A valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Reading

Anthony Doerr – The Future of the Classics

  • Thursday, 16 May 2019 - 6:00pm
MACRO ASILO
Rome
Anthony Doerr (photograph by Ulf Andersen)

In a special preview of the XVIII Edition of the Rome International Literature Festival, the Pulitzer Prize–winning writer Anthony Doerr (2005 Fellow), author of All the Light We Cannot See (2014) and a Resident at the American Academy in Rome this spring, will read an unpublished text exploring the theme of this year’s festival: Il domani dei classici/The Future of the Classics.

The event is a collaboration between the American Academy in Rome, the Rome International Literature Festival, Macro Asilo and BUR Rizzoli, Doerr’s Italian publisher, which celebrates its seventieth anniversary this year.

The events of the Rome International Literature Festival, conceived and organized by Maria Ida Gaeta, will continue from June 4 to July 3, 2019, at the Basilica di Massenzio in the Roman Forum.

Anthony Doerr is the Writer in Residence at the American Academy in Rome for the spring 2019.

The event will be held in English and Italian. Simultaneous translation will be available.

MACRO ASILO
Auditorium
via Nizza, 138
00198 Rome Italy

Conversations/Conversazioni

Mark Robbins, Patricia Cronin, and Stefan Sagmeister – Visible Body

  • Wednesday, 22 May 2019 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Patricia Cronin (2007 Fellow), “Memorial to a Marriage,” 2004. Fuhrman Family Collection, New York (artwork © Patricia Cronin; photograph provided by the artist). Courtesy of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: The Body.

Immediately preceding the opening of the exhibition The Academic Body, which tracks the transformation of the body in art and society from 1894 to the present, Mark Robbins, curator of the exhibition and President of the American Academy in Rome, will speak with two of the artists in the exhibition, Patrica Cronin (2007 Fellow) and Stefan Sagmeiter, current Henry Wolf Graphic Designer in Residence.

The conversation will be held in English.

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is the 2018–19 season sponsor of Conversations/Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome.

A valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Exhibition

The Academic Body

  • Wednesday, 22 May 2019 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
McKim, Mead & White Building
Rome

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: The Body.

Sanford Biggers (2018 Fellow), Patricia Cronin (2007 Fellow), Daniel Chester French, Stephen Greene (1954 Fellow), Ann Hamilton (2017 Resident), Lyle Ashton Harris (2001 Fellow), Tom Johnson/Adrienne Kennedy, Sally Mann, Paul Manship (1912 Fellow), Jessie Marino (2019 Fellow), Beverly McIver (2018 Fellow), Ana Mendieta (1984 Fellow), Wangechi Mutu (2019 Resident), Catherine Opie, Stefan Sagmeister (2019 Resident), David Schutter (2016 Fellow), SISSI (2007 Italian Fellow), Giuseppe Stampone (2014 Italian Fellow), Catherine Wagner (2014 Fellow), Deborah Willis (2019 Resident).

Since the origins of representation, the human body has been a vehicle for a variety of approaches to artistic expression. As a way of imagining the divine, as a site of ideal beauty and ruminations on mortality, or as the contested ground between nature and culture, bodies—and representations of bodies—index culture’s ideas about itself and mark the locus for the questioning and contestation of the human form.

Recently, the body has reemerged as a work in progress, a canvas to be altered, conforming to changing canons of beauty or constantly evolving constructed gender roles. In this capacity, the body as a malleable form has once again taken center stage in cultural debate and artistic expression. As lightning rods for contemporary social issues—including the violence committed against the marginalized, the recognition of transgender individuals, and the replacement of workers by robotics, to name only a few examples—bodies have assumed unprecedented visibility in political discourse.

Mindful of these issues, this exhibition tracks the ways in which the body has been interrogated and transformed in contemporary art from 1894 to the present. As it has evolved from a stalwart of Academic artistic practice to a laboratory for cutting-edge dialogue between critical theory and creative endeavor, the American Academy in Rome (AAR) is uniquely qualified to host an exhibition tracking the changing representations of the body in art and society. In so doing, the institution reflects critically on its own trajectory and enduring relevance. The Academic Body features work by artists affiliated with the AAR (Fellows and Residents) whose work has explored the above themes in provocative ways, as well as artists whose trajectories have intersected meaningfully and critically with Italy and the Academic tradition.

The exhibition is curated by Mark Robbins, President and CEO of the American Academy in Rome, and Peter Benson Miller, Andrew Heiskell Arts Director. It is made possible by the Roy Lichtenstein Artist in Residence Fund, the Robert Mapplethorpe Photographer in Residence Fund, the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, and the Terra Foundation for American Art. A fully illustrated catalogue accompanying the exhibition includes essay contributions from Mary Beard (2019 Resident), Leslie Cozzi (2018 Fellow), and Deborah Willis (2019 Resident), as well as by Robbins and Miller.

The exhibition is on view from May 23 to July 13, 2019, Thursday through Saturday, 4:00–7:00pm.

A valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.