Eventi

Calendario

Marzo 2018

Fellow Shoptalks

Jessica Gabriel Peritz - Domesticating the Tenth Muse: Sublime Suffering, the Good Mother, and Luigia Todi's Voice

  • Giovedì, 1 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

This talk interprets the unusual reception of opera singer Luigia Todi through the lens of shifting discourses around female voices, bodies, and subjectivities in late eighteenth-century Italy. By reading Todi’s singing against contemporary representations of female genius and debates about women’s “social utility,” it argues that vocal sounds, and the knowledge they seemed to reveal about a (gendered) self, were mediated through the twin fantasies of female suffering and maternal voice. The presentation opens up one piece of the broader narrative traced through Peritz’s dissertation project, which is entitled “The Lyric Mode of Voice: Song and Subjectivity in Italy, 1769–1815.”

Jessica Gabriel Peritz is the Marian and Andrew Heiskell Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies at the American Academy in Rome and a PhD candidate in Music History at the University of Chicago.

The event will be held in English. You can watch it livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Fellow Shoptalks

Anna Majeski - Cosmos and Community at the Palazzo della Ragione in Padua

  • Lunedì, 5 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

The fresco cycle at the Palazzo della Ragione reveals the personalities, occupations, and actions of the citizens of Padua not as the products of chance, but as particular instantiations of the influence of celestial bodies. The cycle is the most encyclopedic visualization of astrological knowledge produced in late medieval Italy, yet despite its extraordinary richness, the frescoes remains marginal within the field of late medieval Italian painting. Indeed, the cycle poses serious methodological difficulties: originally painted by Giotto di Bondone between ca. 1309 and 1312, the cycle was repainted and expanded after a fire in 1420. In this talk, Anna Majeski argues that we should consider the relationship between the two versions of the cycle within a larger history of astrological imagery and their evolving political and social function. In addition, she positions the frescoes in relation to a new form of astrological imagery that uses astrology as a framework for ordering the social body.

Anna Majeski is the Donald and Maria Cox/Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Medieval Studies (year one of a two-year fellowship) at the American Academy in Rome and PhD candidate at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

The event will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conversations/Conversazioni

Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim e Nico Muhly - Contrappunto

  • Martedì, 6 Marzo 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

L’evento è parte della serie Nuove ricerche sulle arti e sulle discipline umanistiche: oriente e occidente.

Da Edward Said in poi, gli studiosi mettono in guardia gli ascoltatori sui vari modi in cui i compositori di musica classica occidentali attingono ad altre tradizioni per camuffare un “Altro” musicale con il quale dialogare e competere. Tali modi vanno dall’uso di significanti esotici stereotipati alla citazione diretta, ma includono anche la più consueta assimilazione di stili, idee e generi.

Per ogni nuova generazione di compositori che cercano di sciogliere il contrappunto dei significanti musicali, la nostra lettura diventa più complessa: in che modo ascoltiamo, per esempio, una composizione del XXI secolo, che allude all’infatuazione di Benjamin Britten per la musica balinese? E in che modo i compositori, oggi, riescono ad affrontare le questioni dell’appropriazione culturale?

Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim e Nico Muhly sono in residenza all’American Academy in Rome.

L’evento si terrà in lingua inglese. Sarà possibile seguirlo in diretta streaming https://livestream.com/aarome.

La Fondazione Helen Frankenthaler è lo sponsor per la stagione 2017/2018 della serie di eventi Conversations/Conversazioni.

I visitatori dell’American Academy in Rome sono pregati di mostrare un documento d’identità all’ingresso. Non è possibile accedere con bagagli o zaini di dimensioni superiori a cm 40 x 35 x 15. Non sono disponibili armadietti né guardaroba.

Conference

Trans Bodies: razza, genere, mito e performance

  • Giovedì, 8 Marzo 2018 - da 3:00pm a 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Come parte della mostra Cinque Mostre 2018 – The Tesseract, l’American Academy in Rome è lieta di annunciare un giorno di incontri tra gli artisti, i critici e i borsisti, dedicato alla storia, alla mitologia e al significato contemporaneo della transessualità nella pittura, la scultura, il cinema e le esibizioni occidentali. Ispirato dal lavoro degli attuali artisti e dalle importanti figure nell’arte italiana dal Cinquecento fino ai giorni nostri, questa serie di presentazioni e proiezioni esplorerà come le rappresentazioni in evoluzione di corpi trasfigurati, transessuali o non binari, abbiano creato digressivi collegamenti tra ibridità corporea, creatività e potere.

I relatori sono: Leslie Cozzi, Jessica Gabriel Peritz e Alessandro Bava. L’evento si terrà in lingua inglese.

Screening: A. L Steiner and A. K. Burns, Community Action Center, 2010.

Mostra: Cinque Mostre 2018 – The Tesseract aperta il 8 marzo dalle 16.00 alle 20.00.

Il programma in allegato.

Il progetto è stato realizzato grazie al sostegno dell’Adele Chatfield-Taylor and John Guare Fund for the Arts e del Fellows’ Project Fund of the American Academy in Rome.

I visitatori dell’American Academy in Rome sono pregati di mostrare un documento d’identità all’ingresso. Non è possibile accedere con bagagli o zaini di dimensioni superiori a cm 40 x 35 x 15. Non sono disponibili armadietti né guardaroba.

Fellow Shoptalks

Kevin E. Moch

  • Lunedì, 12 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

In 2 BCE, the emperor Augustus was granted the title pater patriae, “father of his country,” by the Roman Senate. That this was an honor that the Senate had awarded only four times in Rome’s seven-hundred-year history, always to men who had saved the Roman state or the city itself from destruction, makes it clear that the patria (“fatherland”) referenced in the title was Rome as the common legal and political state shared by its citizens. This would seem as clear in Augustus’s own commemoration of the event in his Res Gestae, where the final section of autobiographical inscription remembers that “the Senate, the equestrian order, and the people of Rome universally named me pater patriae.”

As straightforward as this would seem, in reality the referentiality of the term patria in the first-century BCE was a much more complex issue than such a memorializing inscription would suggest. This is most clear in first-century authors such as Cicero, Propertius, and Vergil, whose writings show a tendency to align the term patria not with the idea of Rome as shared state but with an individual’s place of origin. That these authors would have a developed cognizance of the peculiar interaction between local affiliation and Roman state identity is quite understandable, considering that each man originated from a different Italian locality with a different history of rights and conflict with the Roman state. Moreover, the potential separability of these two aspects of identity is confirmed by Cicero’s explicit claim that all Romans originating from Italian municipalities had two fatherlands, two patriae: the one, their “true fatherland,” and their place of origin, with the other, the “common fatherland,” equal to the Roman state they held in common with other Romans as citizens.

In this context, this paper sets out to study the specific alignments of perspective attached to various instances of the term patria in the work of the poet Vergil. Using methods inspired by linguistic anthropology and psychological studies of biculturalism, this paper proceeds through a semantic study of the indexicality of the work patria in Vergil’s three surviving works: the EcloguesGeorgics, and Aeneid. In the course of analysis, it emerges that Vergil’s tendency is to use patria to refer not to larger political entities that are the sum of heterogeneous populations, but instead in its local sense to reference the specific region an individual originates from. Against this tendency, the few cases in which patria is used in Vergil’s poetry to refer to Italy or Rome as collective or adoptive “fatherland” become textually significant moments—moments which reveal not only the loss and violence that precipitate broader Italian unity in the poems, but also the more subtle political motivations behind Augustus’s promotion of the idea of a unified Italy and its coextensiveness with Rome.

Kevin Moch is the Arthur Ross Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at the University of California, Berkeley.

The event will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Fellow Shoptalks

Beverly McIver - Moving from Behind the Mask: Owning Who You Are

  • Mercoledì, 14 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

We all wear a mask; some wear multiple disguises. Beverly McIver’s talk will discuss the impact of place and time and its shaping of one’s true self-discovery.

Beverly McIver is the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome and Esbenshade Professor of the Practice of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke University.

The event will be held in English. You can watch it livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Performance

“Gossip, Scandal and Good Manners” rivisitato

  • Giovedì, 15 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Cryptoporticus

Un incontro performativo organizzato da Arnisa Zeqo, all’interno della mostra Cinque Mostre 2018 – The Tesseract.

Il gossip, come forma di comunicazione e come azione politica, è al centro di questo ‘talk show’ all’interno del display di Gossip Scandal and Good Manners (1981), opera dell’artista messicano Ulises Carrion (1949-1989) inserita nel percorso espositivo di Cinque Mostre – The Tesseract, a cura di Ilaria Gianni. (L’installazione è stata realizzata in collaborazione con Suzanne Farrin, Ashley Fure, Tiziana del Grosso, T. Geronimo Johnson, Johanna Lobdell, Tricia Tracey e Joseph Williams).

Se nella performance concettuale di Carrion un piccolo gruppo di persone diffuse una serie di voci parzialmente inventate sulla vita e il lavoro dell’artista, il gossip è tornato nell’inframince delle conversazioni private tra amici e colleghi dell’American Academy in Rome. Nei diversi interventi presentati in questa occasione il gossip emerge come un riferimento che si muove nell’intersezione tra la letteratura, la performance, l’arte concettuale e la vita.

Arnisa Zeqo é stata la Mondriaan Fonds/Dutch Affiliated Fellow preso l’American Academy in Rome nell’autunno del 2017. L’evento si terrà in lingua inglese. Sarà possibile seguirlo in diretta streaming https://livestream.com/aarome

Programma:

Introduzione di Arnisa Zeqo

Presentazione di Joseph Williams e Tiziana del Grosso sulla ‘campagna di gossip’ realizzata all’interno dell’American Academy in Rome

Reading sul gossip nell’antichità a cura di Kevin Moch

Pausa sonora a cura di Susanne Farrin

Reading di poesia di Uljana Wolf

Screening di WU Tsang

Movimento performativo di Ashley Fure, Aroussiak Gabrielian, Alison Hirsch

Cinque Mostre – The Tesseract prosegue fino al 25 marzo.

La mostra raccoglie diverse attitudini e prospettive di ricerca, mettendo in relazione, con interventi site-specific, il lavoro dei Rome Prize Fellows, degli Italian Fellows e di artisti italiani non residenti, valorizzando l’aspetto multidisciplinare e laboratoriale dell’American Academy in Rome, con il suo approccio che guarda ad arti visive, musica, letteratura, produzione audiovisiva, design, architettura, innovazione tecnologica.

Il 15 marzo la mostra è aperta dalle 17.00 alle 20.00.

Il progetto è stato realizzato grazie al sostegno dell’Adele Chatfield-Taylor and John Guare Fund for the Arts e del Fellows’ Project Fund of the American Academy in Rome.

I visitatori dell’American Academy in Rome sono pregati di mostrare un documento d’identità all’ingresso. Non è possibile accedere con bagagli o zaini di dimensioni superiori a cm 40 x 35 x 15. Non sono disponibili armadietti né guardaroba.

Fellow Shoptalks

Liz Ševčenko - Historic Preservation for a Post-Truth Era: Accepting Denial

  • Lunedì, 19 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

We’re nearly two decades into what political commentators call the “post-truth era.” Distinct from political traditions of lying or propaganda, the term describes a culture in which truth is entirely beside the point. The post-truth era poses new challenges to public historians and historic preservationists. With little public faith in facts—especially those that challenge existing beliefs—historic fabric no longer provides forensic evidence of what happened in a place. This has particular implications for how people understand places of past violence, trauma, or struggle, places that invite collective reckoning with contested histories and establish the moral foundation from which to address their contemporary legacies.

This talk will explore “sites of conscience” around the world, from apartheid-era prisons in South Africa to memorials to the disappeared in Argentina. It will also share examples of collective, movement-based, dialogue-driven memory projects in the United States, including the Guantanamo Public Memory Project and a national memory project on mass incarceration. Using these as starting points, Liz Ševčenko hopes to get ideas from colleagues about the questions she is grappling with during her fellowship: How does public memory shape public policy? What are the new opportunities and obligations of preservationists in a post-truth era?

Liz Ševčenko is the Booth Family Rome Prize Fellow in Historic Preservation and Conservation and director of the Humanities Action Lab , a coalition hosted by the New School in New York and Rutgers University in Newark.

The event will be held in English. You can watch it livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Fellow Shoptalks

Suzanne Farrin - Finding Music in the Visual City

  • Mercoledì, 21 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Salone

With seemingly endless opportunities to learn human history through painting, sculpture and architecture, Rome is a city for the eyes. What does it mean to be a composer immersed in this profoundly visual experience? What are the territories that open as a result of translating art into the language of music? Suzanne Farrin will discuss how Michelangelo’s subtractive process shaped her approach to composing while writing an opera on his texts, and how this sculptural mindset may have further led her uncovering sounds in the piano.

Suzanne Farrin is the Frederic A. Juilliard/Walter Damrosch Rome Prize Fellow in Musical Composition at the American Academy in Rome and the Frayda B. Lindemann Professor of Music at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York.

The event will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Patricia H. Labalme Friends of the Library Lecture

Mary Roberts - A oriente dell’occidente: Edward Said, il tempo della malinconia e l’interno orientalista

  • Giovedì, 22 Marzo 2018 - 6:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome

L’evento è parte della serie Nuove ricerche sulle arti e sulle discipline umanistiche: oriente e occidente.

Le invenzioni di articoli di orologeria come il cronometro marino (la conquista tecnologica che ha permesso una più accurata navigazione del globo) e il trasferimento delle modalità di misurazione del tempo tipiche delle metropoli agli avamposti coloniali hanno costituito il fulcro dell’imperialismo degli stati-nazione europei nel XIX secolo. Il progresso dell’Occidente, così come il suo contrario, il non-Occidente inteso come depositario della pre-modernità, sono stati parte del telos del colonialismo e dell’orientalismo moderni. Come afferma Edward Said nel paragrafo iniziale dell’influente Orientalism [Orientalismo], l’Oriente di invenzione europea è sconfitto dal tempo: “come se tutto fosse finito.”

La recente svolta globale della nostra disciplina risitua l’orientalismo europeo all’interno di una geografia culturale più ampia e più politicamente contesa. Si tratta di un passaggio da oriente a occidente. In che modo la logica temporale della modernità viene articolata in maniera diversa in questa ampliata geografia culturale del visivo? L’analisi degli arredamenti interni di due artisti-collezionisti e orientalisti britannici del XIX secolo, situate nelle capitali imperiali di Istanbul e Londra, e dell’arte islamica ed europea che esse mettono in mostra svela il loro coinvolgimento con l’orientalismo britannico, ottomano e siciliano. In questo modo, la conferenza rivela il modo in cui l’estetica di questi spazi fosse coniugata dall’eterocronicità della modernità ottomana ed europea. Concentrarci sulla logica temporale di questi siti ci permette di approfondire le complessità transculturali e trans-storiche del tempo dell’arte.

Mary Roberts è John Schaeffer Professor of Art History alla University of Sydney in Australia. È autrice di Istanbul Exchanges: Ottomans, Orientalists, and Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture (Oakland: University of California Press, 2015), in cui si rintracciano gli schemi dello scambio transculturale tra l’Europa e l’Impero ottomano nel XIX secolo. Istanbul Exchanges ha vinto il premio dell’Art Association of Australia and New Zealand come miglior libro nel 2016, anno in cui è anche stato tradotto in turco. Roberts ha pubblicato anche Intimate Outsiders: The Harem in Ottoman and Orientalist Art and Travel Literature (Durham: Duke University Press, 2007). Il suo attuale progetto editoriale, Artists as Collectors of Islamic Art, estende la sua indagine circa la temporalità della modernità forgiata dallo scambio visivo tra culture.

L’evento si terrà in lingua inglese. Sarà possibile seguirlo in diretta streaming https://livestream.com/aarome.

Insieme alla mostra Yto Barrada. The Dye Garden—che inaugurerà il 10 maggio—e al simposio internazionale Islamic Art and Architecture in Italy: Between Tradition and Innovation del 17 e 18 maggio, la conferenza di Mary Roberts sarà uno degli eventi conclusivi del programma dell’AAR sui temi di Oriente e Occidente.

I visitatori dell’American Academy in Rome sono pregati di mostrare un documento d’identità all’ingresso. Non è possibile accedere con bagagli o zaini di dimensioni superiori a cm 40 x 35 x 15. Non sono disponibili armadietti né guardaroba.

Fellow Shoptalks

Diana Garvin - The Bean in the Machine

  • Lunedì, 26 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Italian coffee culture grew up with Fascism: new commercial trade routes linked East African farmers to Northern Italian vendors, establishing transnational commercial imbalances writ in beans and machines. To demonstrate how dictatorial politics transformed caffè culture, this talk will use colonial commodities (coffee beans) to examine how artistic aesthetics (Futurism and Primitivism) shaped industrial design (espresso machines and ceramic cups). At stake in this research is a larger question: How do you study far-right politics without reifying their discriminatory power structures? In other words, how do you research something ugly?

Diana Garvin is the Paul Mellon/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and assistant professor in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon.

The event will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Fellow Shoptalks

Ishion Hutchinson - The Mariner's Progress: A Listening

  • Martedì, 27 Marzo 2018 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

A self-reflexive listening to the sea, this talk is a lyric view and an elegy to progress in the Caribbean where one is perpetually placed in relation to outside imperial powers. These powers are not only economical, but also narrative—the power of voice which chronicles the islands’ history as they are been bought and sold.

Ishion Hutchinson is the recipient of the Joseph Brodsky Rome Prize in Literature (a gift of the Drue Heinz Trust) and professor in the Department of English at Cornell University.

The event will be held in English.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.