Zoom Video

When Things Fall Apart

Wednesday, April 13, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Detail of Guillermo Kuitca, Untitled, 2013, oil on canvas mounted on cardboard, 11¾ x 15¾ in. (artwork © Guillermo Kuitca; photograph by Jon Etter and licensed from Hauser & Wirth)

A Conversation/Conversazioni with Guillermo Kuitca (2022 Resident) and Sonya Clark (2017 Affiliated Fellow) will be held in conjunction with the opening of the exhibition Regeneration. The event will be moderated by Lindsay Harris, interim Andrew Heiskell Arts Director and cocurator of Regeneration.

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation generously supports Conversations/Conversazioni at the American Academy in Rome.

The Residency of Guillermo Kuitca is made possible by the Mary Miss Resident in Visual Art Fund.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

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The Pope at War

Tuesday, May 10, 2022–6:00 PM
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italy
Detail of the cover of David Kertzer's book The Pope at War, showing a yellow and orange tinted photograph of a Roman avenue, with a car and men on motorcycles driving toward the photographer; to the right and left sides of the road are soldiers on horseback

Detail of the cover of David Kertzer’s new book, The Pope at War: The Secret History of Pius XII, Mussolini, and Hitler

A Friends of the Library Lecture on the topic of a new book, The Pope at War: The Secret History of Pius XII, Mussolini, and Hitler by the historian David Kertzer (2000 Resident), will take place at the Academy with the author. Also speaking are Ruth Ben-Ghiat (2022 Resident), Lutz Klinkhammer (German Historical Institute in Rome), Simon Levis Sullam (University of Venice, Ca’ Foscari), and Marla Stone, Andrew W. Mellon Humanities Professor (1996 Fellow).

Based on newly opened Vatican archives, The Pope at War is a riveting book about Pope Pius XII and his actions during World War II, including how he responded to the Holocaust. Kertzer is the Paul Dupee Jr. University Professor of Social Science and a professor of anthropology and Italian studies at Brown University, where he served as provost from 2006 to 2011. He is the author of twelve books, including The Pope and Mussolini (2014), winner of a Pulitzer Prize.

The Patricia H. Labalme Friends of the Library Lecture, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. To watch on Zoom, please register in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

The Friends of the Library supports the Academy’s Arthur & Janet C. Ross Library through annual dues and special initiatives. The group also helps to raise awareness of the Library’s resources through regular programs. Join online today!

Notice

Space in the Sala Aurelia is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

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Making the Past: Perspectives on Keeping and Letting Go

Tuesday, May 17, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Color photograph of a bamboo or wooden scaffolding covering the Hatharas Kotuwa (tee cube) of a stupa; sculptures of three figures with their palms facing each other as if in prayer

Repainting a stupa in Sri Lanka (photograph by Gamini Wijesuriya and provided by ICCROM)

Monuments, like those that define Rome, are intended to be permanent but can be most powerful when they are in decline, as ruins and remains. How do those engaged in historic preservation come to terms with this paradox? When is change acceptable, in what forms, and who gets to decide? Claire Lyons and Webber Ndoro will offer a transhistorical and cross-cultural set of responses to these questions, considering the politics of preservation from the perspective of institutions, governments, and a range of stakeholder communities.

This program is organized in conjunction with the AAR exhibition Regeneration, on view through June 12, 2022. Elizabeth Rodini, the Academy’s interim Director and a cocurator of Regeneration, will moderate.

Claire Lyons (2022 Resident) is curator in the Department of Antiquities at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and a specialist in the art and archaeology of pre-Roman Italy, Etruria, and Magna Graecia. Webber Ndoro is director general of ICCROM, an expert in global heritage management with a particular focus on the immovable heritage of sub-Saharan Africa.

This event, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register in advance to watch on Zoom. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation generously supports Conversations/Conversazioni at the American Academy in Rome.

The International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM), based in Rome, is a cosponsor of this event.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

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Nancy MacLean – The Pre-History—and Likely Sequels—of the Insurrection at the US Capitol

Thursday, February 10, 2022–6:00 PM
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italy

People from the Save America rally breach the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC, January 6, 2021 (photograph © Debra Reschoff Ahearn | Dreamstime.com)

A part of a two-day conference entitled “Political Violence: From the Storming of the US Capitol to the March on Rome,” hosted by the American Academy in Rome, this first keynote speech will be delivered by the American historian Nancy MacLean. A second keynote will be given by Alexander Hinton.

The attack on the United States Capitol on January 6, 2021, was the most violent assault on democracy in modern US history. It has since become clear that then-President Trump and a coterie of his closest advisors incited the attack on Congress to abet a coup that would overrule the voters’ choice. The House select committee charged with investigating these events has identified three rings of activity: a large, less complicit, outer circle of avid Trump voters, a smaller number of resolute white-power revolutionaries, and a suited inner circle that strategized to overthrow the election, exploiting federalism to achieve its ends. Nancy MacLean’s talk will explain how each three of these elements is the product of decades of intentional cultivation. Indeed, as her 2017 book Democracy in Chains showed and subsequent research has elaborated, what we are seeing in the US today is the coming together of a network of arch-right corporate donors determined to remake the world, a major political party their grantees have radicalized beyond recognition, and actions on the spectrum of vigilantism in multiple arenas being spurred by highly profitable media outlets. If we don’t reckon with the deep historical roots of what happened this time last year, those events could be a pilot for and prologue to a far worse outcome in the future—not least because this cause is transnational, and intentionally seeding kindred developments on other continents.

Nancy MacLean is the William H. Chafe Professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University and the author of several award-winning books, most recently, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America. A New York Times Best Seller, it was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2017 and the winner of the 2018 Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Current Affairs and the 2018 Lillian Smith Book Award for outstanding writing about the American South. In 2021–22, she is researching a new book as the John Hope Franklin Fellow at the National Humanities Center.

The lecture will be given in English.

This event, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. To attend online, please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Villa Aurelia is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Watch the video

Alexander Hinton – White Power and the Rising Threat of Violence in the US

Friday, February 11, 2022–6:00 PM
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italy

Robert E. Lee statue in Richmond, Virginia, defaced with graffiti during Black Lives Matter protests on Juneteenth 2020 (photograph © Mtdozier23 | Dreamstime.com)

A part of a two-day conference entitled “Political Violence: From the Storming of the US Capitol to the March on Rome,” hosted by the American Academy in Rome, this second keynote speech will be delivered by the anthropologist and human-rights specialist Alexander Hinton. The first keynote will be given by Nancy MacLean.

If many people in the United States were shocked by Donald Trump’s 2016 election, many more were stunned when, months later, white power extremists took to the streets of Charlottesville chanting “Blood and Soil” and “Jews will not replace us!” Like Trump, the Charlottesville marchers were dismissed as aberrations—the momentary appearance of “racists” and “haters” who did not represent the real United States. Rather than being exceptional, these events are symptoms of the country’s long history of racism and systemic white supremacy, genocide, and atrocity crimes. And, as underscored by the Capitol riot that ended Trump’s term, there is a strong likelihood that such violence will occur again. This reality, Alexander Hinton argues in a recently published book, It Can Happen Here: White Power and the Rising Threat of Genocide in the US (2021), is a key lesson learned from the Trump presidency. Building on the arguments in his book, this keynote explores the dynamics of white power extremism in the US and asks if “it can happen here.”

Alexander Hinton is the Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers University, where he is also Director and UNESCO Chair in Genocide Prevention for the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights. His 2005 book Why Did They Kill? Cambodia in the Shadow of Genocide won the Robert B Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology from the American Anthropological Association and the Stirling Prize for Best Published Work in Psychological Anthropology from the Society for Psychological Anthropology. Hinton’s more recent publications are Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer (2016) and The Justice Facade: Trials of Transition in Cambodia (2018).

The lecture will be given in English.

This event, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. To attend online, please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Villa Aurelia is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Alex Hinton is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University.

The lecture will be given in English.

This event, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. To attend online, please register for Zoom in advance (link forthcoming). After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Villa Aurelia is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Watch the video

Germane Barnes & Valerio Morabito

Monday, March 14, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a solid red background

Germane Barnes
Structuring Blackness in Rome

While Blackness in America carries a particular connotation, there is a woeful absence of consideration as to how Roman and Italian architecture may be understood through the lens of nonwhite constructors. Germane Barnes will explain his professional trajectory within architecture and how Blackness has shaped his experiences in the built environment.

Germane Barnes is the Rome Prize Fellow in Architecture and an assistant professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Miami.

Valerio Morabito
Between Image and Imagination of American Cities

The talk presents a series of drawings realized at AAR regarding American Cities. The presentation is divided into two parts. The first part is dedicated to drawings representing existing American Cities, even if imagined and transformed in shapes and significance. Cities like New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Las Vegas, and more (Rome as an antagonist) have uncommon geometries and perspectives. They show inner attitudes and belongings, coming from the accumulation of memories, traces, and notes. In the second part, the narrative switches to abstract cities between image and imagination. Paraphrasing the famous Italo Calvino’s book Six Memos for the Next Millennium, the aim is to visualize and describe American Cities that evolve free from real contexts: Other Cities for Now. These drawings envision Cities that struggle to understand what they will be in the next millennium or, better and less pretentious, for this near future.

Valerio Morabito is the Enel Foundation Italian Fellow in Architecture, Urban Design, and Landscape Architecture, an architect, and a professor at the Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria and the University of Pennsylvania.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Watch the video

Rosa Sessa & Michael Lee

Monday, May 9, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a solid red background

Rosa Sessa
American Architects in Postwar Italy: In Search of an Alternative Modernity

The postwar era is a crucial moment in the definition not only of new economic and political paths between the New and the Old Continent but also of new directions in the cultural and architectural exchange between Italy and the United States. In the period of broadest success of the modernist International Style in architecture, both domestically and abroad, Italy and its heritage only apparently seem to fall from the intellectual map of the modern American architect. On the contrary, a resurgent interest in Italian architecture—and a widening of questions and issues related to the country and never unfolded before—can be detected in the trajectories and projects pursued by the young Americans who were able to conduct research programs and extensively travel overseas. The first-hand experience of postwar Italy will help them in carrying out projects that would eventually have an influencing and long-lasting impact on the American perception of the country, and on the history of American architecture itself.

Rosa Sessa is the Italian Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and a research fellow in history of architecture in the Department of Architecture at the Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II.

Michael Lee
Ganymede’s Garden: Homoeroticism and the Italian Landscape

The Italian landscape has for centuries been a locus amoenus of male same-sex desire. Serving as an idealized setting for homoerotic visual representation and narratives of self-discovery, it has equally been the locus for social practices that gave rise to these associations. Cardinals and popes entertained male lovers in their Roman villa gardens, enhancing the atmosphere with homoerotic works of art. Northern aristocrats traveled to Italy on the Grand Tour in search not only of intellectual and aesthetic pleasures but also sexual liaisons with Mediterranean men. In the process they were equally seduced by the gardens, groves, and coastal landscapes of a warmer climate, discovering an ambience that seemed to promote and even sanction more relaxed social mores. With a focus on the early modern period, this project examines sites, texts, and artworks linking homoeroticism with Italian landscapes and develops a methodology for analyzing gay culture through a landscape framework.

Michael Lee is the Prince Charitable Trusts/Kate Lancaster Brewster Rome Prize Fellow in Landscape Architecture and the Reuben M. Rainey Professor in the History of Landscape Architecture in the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Virginia.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Rosa Sessa’s talk was recorded and is available below.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Watch the video

Alessio Battistella & Grace Funsten

Thursday, December 9, 2021–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a light purple background

Alessio Battistella
Learning from the limit

Alessio Battistella will try to demonstrate through examples that the best answer to a technical problem is not necessarily the most developed from a technological point of view, but actually the most adaptable to the context, capable of increasing the autonomy of the context itself.

Alessio Battistella is the Enel Foundation Italian Fellow in Architecture, Urban Design, and Landscape Architecture and an architect at ARCò – Architettura e Cooperazione in Milan.

Grace Funsten
Death and the Domina: The Influence of Erotic Elegy on Latin Verse Epitaphs

The talk will be focused on allusions to Augustan elegy in CIL 6.5302, an epitaph for an unnamed woman found in Columbarium 3 of the Vigna Codini. It will also consider CIL 6.5302 in the context of the other epitaphs from Columbarium 3, many of which were for slaves and freedmen of the Imperial family.

Grace Funsten is the Emeline Hill Richardson/Arthur Ross Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at the University of Washington.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Watch the video

Marla Stone – Acts of Self-Representation: Nazi-Fascist Wartime Cultural Diplomacy

Monday, September 27, 2021–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Charcoal drawing of a uniformed soldier with a horse to his left

Detail of Antonio Giuseppe Santagata’s charcoal drawing Saint George, Patron Saint of the Cavalry

Between the signing of the Pact of Steel in 1939 and the military defeats of 1943, the Nazi and Fascist dictatorships mobilized culture to introduce their respective publics to the ideology and politics of the other—in search of Axis mutuality and shared purpose. Traveling exhibitions mounted by the Fascist and Nazi regimes during World War II were acts of cultural exchange, soft diplomacy, and propaganda which used the form of the exhibition to present a self-image that each regime hoped would offer restless publics a convincing rationale for total war.

Marla Stone, a professor of modern European history at Occidental College in Los Angeles and a 1996 Rome Prize Fellow in Post-Classical Humanistic Studies, is the newly appointed Andrew W. Mellon Humanities Professor at the American Academy in Rome. A historian of modern Italy with a focus on fascism, authoritarianism, and genocide, Stone works on the intersection of ideology, culture, and the state. Her books include The Patron State: Culture and Politics in Fascist Italy and The Fascist Revolution.

The lecture will be held in English.

This event, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please join the Zoom meeting a few minutes before 6:30pm CET; the moderator will let viewers in when the event starts.

Notice

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Watch the video

Lindsay Harris – Fueling the Carbon Empire: Esther Bubley’s Standard Oil Photographs Abroad

Monday, October 4, 2021–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Black and white photograph of a stylish modern woman drinking an espresso at a bar; behind her is a young Italian mother holding a small child

Esther Bubley, detail of Giuliana Campioni in coffee shop, Rome, Italy, 1952. Standard Oil (New Jersey) Collection, Photographic Archives, University of Louisville, Kentucky

From the 1930s through the 1950s, American photographers pushed the boundaries of their medium by recording the human toll of the Great Depression and, later, the impact of World War II on Americans’ daily lives. Typically celebrated as crusaders for social justice, these photographers are seldom recognized for fueling another facet of American society: the nation’s oil industry. In 1943, Standard Oil (New Jersey) commissioned some of the most renowned photographers of their generation to show the benefits of oil in the lives of everyone. Among them, Esther Bubley, a prize-winning magazine photographer, was the only photographer sent to show the reach of American oil in Europe. The pictures she took in Italy and Denmark between 1952 and 1955 show how modernization was transforming the continent’s landscape and culture, including newfound independence for women, one of her principal subjects. They also highlight how women photographers like Bubley shaped perceptions of these changes in the public eye. Above all, this suite of pictures attests to a moment when photographers brought to light the humanity of the “Carbon Empire,” a term Reinhold Martin has coined to describe the oil production system that has provoked war, racialized violence, and climate change across the globe.

Lindsay Harris is the Interim Andrew Heiskell Arts Director at the American Academy in Rome. A historian of nineteenth- and twentieth-century photography and a 2014 Fellow in modern Italian studies, she served as the Academy’s Andrew W. Mellon Professor-in-Charge of the Humanities through 2018. In that role, Harris curated the Academy exhibition Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian Town, which traveled to the Museo Nazionale d’Arte Medievale e Moderna in Matera and to the Italian Cultural Institute in New York. Most recently, she has been developing a paradigm for an open access digital humanities journal with the Digital Publications team at the Bibliotheca Hertiziana – Max Planck Institute for Art History in Rome. New ways of publishing research that leverage digital technologies underpin her approach to the material she will discuss in this talk.

The lecture will be held in English.

This event, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Notice

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Watch the video
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