Conversations/Conversazioni

Colm Tóibín & Sara Antonelli – On Henry James

Tuesday, October 18, 2016–6:00 PM
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italy
Colm Tóibín with Sara Antonelli - On Henry James

This event is the Patricia H. Labalme Friends of the Library Lecture and is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

This year marks the centenary of the death of Henry James, the literary titan and cosmopolitan figure whose classic novels explore the culture clash between brash Americans and jaded European society. In this event, Colm Tóibín, the author of the award-winning novel The Master (2004), which unpacks James’s complex character towards the end of the writer’s life, will discuss James’s legacy with Sara Antonelli, who teaches Anglo American literature at the Università degli Studi Roma Tre.

From early novels such as The Europeans or The Portrait of a Lady, which pitted the innocence of the new world against the corruption of the old, to later works, including The Golden Bowl and The Wings of the Dove, James crafted increasingly nuanced portraits of American identities thrown into relief by their experiences abroad. Many of his stories are set against the backdrop of Rome, drawing upon James’s thorough knowledge of the inner workings of its patrician palaces and artists’ studios. James himself, however, despite his prolific output, copious letters, notebooks, novels, and plays, as well as the many portraits of him by friends, remains an enigmatic figure. This has made him and his work an alluring subject for contemporary scholars and writers, including Tóibín, who have speculated about many aspects of his personal life, including his sexual proclivities, his friendships with men and women, his relationships with his siblings, and his ill-fated interest in the theater.

The event will be held in English.

The 2016–17 Conversations/Conversazioni series is sponsored by the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Embassy of Ireland in Italy.

2017 Arthur and Janet C. Ross Rome Prize Ceremony

Thursday, April 20, 2017–6:30 PM
Morgan Library and Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
United States
Arthur & Janet C. Ross Rome Prize Ceremony

Teresita Fernandez, Visual Artist (2018 Resident, 1999 Affiliated Fellow)

Mark Robbins, AAR President (1997 Fellow)

This event is free to the public. You can watch it live at https://livestream.com/aarome.

The 2016–17 season of Conversations/Conversazioni is sponsored by the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

2018 Arthur and Janet C. Ross Rome Prize Ceremony

Thursday, April 12, 2018–6:30 PM
Frederick P. Rose Auditorium at Cooper Union
41 Cooper Square
New York, NY
United States
Arthur and Janet C. Ross Rome Prize Ceremony

Arthur and Janet C. Ross Rome Prize Ceremony
Thursday, 12 April 2018 – 6:30pm
Frederick P. Rose Auditorium
Cooper Union
41 Cooper Square, New York

Each year the Rome Prize is awarded to emerging artists and scholars who represent the highest standard of excellence in the arts and humanities. Please join us as we announce the 2018–19 Rome Prize winners and Italian Fellows at the Arthur and Janet C. Ross Rome Prize Ceremony.

The event also features a Conversations | Conversazioni with the artist Ann Hamilton, a 2017 Resident, and Mark Robbins, AAR president and CEO and a 1997 Fellow. The dialogue will be followed by a prosecco toast.

This event is at capacity. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis ONLY for those who have RSVP’d in advance.

Musa Mayer & Marc Payot – Encounters with Philip Guston

Thursday, March 12, 2020–6:30 PM
Hauser & Wirth
548 West 22nd Street
New York, NY
United States
Canceled

This discussion will feature two speakers—the author Musa Mayer and Marc Payot, president of Hauser & Wirth—for an engaging dialogue about the impact of Rome and Italy on the prolific later work of the American artist Philip Guston (1949 Fellow, 1971 Resident).

The conversation will take place at Hauser & Wirth, 548 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011.

This event is free and open to the public; an RSVP is required.

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is the 2019–20 season sponsor of Conversations/Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome.

Mary T. Boatwright & Mia Fuller – Colonial Cities and Imperial Citizens

Tuesday, February 23, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Zoom
Central European Time
Rome, Italy
Black and white aerial photograph of the Italian city of Littoria, showing buildings, roads, and plazas

The Italian city of Littoria, founded in 1932 by Benito Mussolini, was renamed Latina in 1946

Augustus and other emperors established some 150 colonies in the provinces and Italy itself. Population displacement is but one aspect of the turmoil such settlements incurred. Did such colonies, said “to embody the Roman people’s unparalleled greatness,” contribute to an imperial “Romanitas”? How did their urban forms contribute to making “Roman” the empire’s sixty-million-plus population of differing cultures, languages, and religions, especially given the lag time to actually build such cities?

Mussolini’s regime self-consciously invoked ancient models, not only by staging him as a new Augustus through urban works, but by founding entirely new towns—147 of them in the 1930s. Focusing on the best-known case (the Pontine Marshes reclamation), this conversation will explore parallels and differences across eras. How did the state-driven settlements of Italians from one region to another inspire or discourage senses of citizenship? Were rituals of foundation as important under Fascism as they were in antiquity?

Mary T. Boatwright (2021 Resident) is professor emerita of classical studies at Duke University, and Mia Fuller (1998 Fellow) is the Gladyce Arata Terrill Distinguished [Associate] Professor of Italian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.

This conversation, to be presented on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register in advance. The start time is 6:00pm Central European Time (12:00 noon Eastern Time).

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is the 2020–21 season sponsor of Conversations/Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome.

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Rebecca Zorach & Nicole Marroquin – Toward Freedom: Chicago Muralists in the Struggle for Liberation

Tuesday, March 9, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Zoom
Central European Time
Rome, Italy
2021 Conversations - Rebecca Zorach and Nicole Marroquin

William Walker, Eugene “Eda” Wade, and other artists, detail of The Wall of Truth, 1969 (photograph from the Public Art Workshop)

In August 1967, a group of artists in Chicago created a mural of Black heroes, The Wall of Respect, which quickly became a rallying point for activists, neighborhood residents, and cultural workers and spawned a broader community mural movement not only in Chicago but nationwide. It is uncontroversial to say that such murals represented the aspirations and political struggles of communities. But art critics and historians have tended to downplay their political agency as well as their artistic importance, thinking of them as affirming but ultimately anodyne expressions of identity.

What if instead we consider murals as interventions in and contestations of urban space? What would it mean to think of murals as shaping space and people’s experience of it, mediating relationships among groups, staking claims to visibility, belonging, and the right to the city? Rebecca Zorach and Nicole Marroquin will address these questions with examples drawn from the long history of public art and political movements in Chicago.

Rebecca Zorach (2021 Resident) is the Mary Jane Crowe Professor in Art and Art History at Northwestern University, and Nicole Marroquin is an interdisciplinary artist and associate professor of art education at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

This conversation, to be presented on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

The start time is 6:00pm Central European Time (12:00 noon Eastern Time). It is being recorded and will be edited and posted on the AAR website at a later date.

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is the 2020–21 season sponsor of Conversations/Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome.

Jorge Otero-Pailos & Sheena Wagstaff – Roots of the City

Thursday, March 11, 2021–12:00 PM
AAR Zoom
Eastern Time
New York, NY
United States
Installation view of Jorge Otero-Pailos’s <em>The Ethics of Dust</em> at Westminster Hall in 2016

Installation view of Jorge Otero-Pailos’s The Ethics of Dust at Westminster Hall in 2016, commissioned by Artangel (photograph by Marcus J. Leith)

Jorge Otero-Pailos is an artist, preservationist, and professor and director of the Historic Preservation Program in the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University. Sheena Wagstaff is Leonard A. Lauder Chairman of the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The discussion will be moderated by Elizabeth Rodini, Andrew Heiskell Arts Director at the American Academy in Rome.

This Conversations/Conversazioni, to be presented on Zoom and held in English, is free and open to the public. Please register in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

The start time is 12:00pm Eastern Time (6:00pm Central European Time). It is being recorded and will be edited and posted on the AAR website at a later date.

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is the 2020–21 season sponsor of Conversations/Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome.

Pamela O. Long & Nicola Camerlenghi – The City of Rome: Urban Infrastructure and Urban Form from Medieval to Early Modern Times

Tuesday, April 13, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Zoom
Central European Time
Rome, Italy
2021 Conversations - Pamela O. Long and Nicola Camerlenghi

Detail of Anthonis van den Wijngaerde, View of Rome from the Janiculum, 1540–50, pen and brown ink, brown and blue wash, over black chalk, on 3 pieces of paper glued together, 8 5/16 x 51 3/16 in. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Since Rome was not built in a day, how can we understand the processes by which the city developed? Nicola Camerlenghi and Pamela O. Long (2004 Fellow, 2021 Resident) have addressed this challenge for the medieval and early modern city, respectively.

Camerlenghi, associate professor of art history at Dartmouth College and digital humanities fellow at Villa I Tatti, has developed a diachronic, digital map of towers, bell towers, and other features to chart the medieval city’s network of power and surveillance. Long, an independent scholar of late medieval and Renaissance history, has studied long runs of documents and numerous printed maps across various Roman archives uncovering conflicts and problems during the late sixteenth century. Both scholars have then confronted their primary evidence with a first-hand, holistic engagement with the city. This Conversations/Conversazioni will treat their different but interrelated approaches to the evolving Eternal City.

This conversation, to be presented on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

The start time of this lecture is 6:00pm Central European Time (12:00 noon Eastern Time). It is being recorded and will be edited and posted on the AAR website at a later date.

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is the 2020–21 season sponsor of Conversations/Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome.

David Nirenberg & Avinoam Shalem – On Ghettoes: Medieval, Modern, and Metaphorical

Tuesday, February 2, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Zoom
Central European Time
Rome, Italy
Color photograph of Campo di Ghetto Nuovo in Venice, featuring an open plaza with people and dogwalkers in the foreground, and six and seven story residential buildings in the background, each painted in shades of red, tan, and yellow

View of Campo di Ghetto Nuovo in Venice in 2009 (photograph by h_laca and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license)

The first Conversations/Conversazioni of the calendar year will feature David Nirenberg (2021 Resident), the Deborah R. and Edgar D. Jannotta Distinguished Service Professor of Medieval History and Social Thought at the University of Chicago, where he is also dean of the Divinity School, and AAR Director Avinoam Shalem (2016 Resident).

“Ghetto” emerged as a word to describe a specific late-medieval phenomenon: the creation in Christian cities of segregated and walled neighborhoods in which Jews were required to live. Today its meanings are vaster, and it serves as a metaphor for many different types of containment and segregation. How did these urban spaces emerge? Why did they prove so useful as marginal spaces and a metaphor? And what work do the phenomenon and the metaphor do today?

This conversation, to be presented on Zoom, is free and open to the public. The start time is 6:00pm Central European Time (12:00 noon Eastern Time).

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is the 2020–21 season sponsor of Conversations/Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome.

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A. O. Scott & Garrett Bradley

Monday, November 23, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Zoom
Eastern Time
New York, NY
United States
Black and white film still of a closeup of Fox Rich looking into a mirror

Fox Rich is the subject of Garrett Bradley’s new film, Time (2020)

The New York Times critic at large A. O. Scott (2020 Resident) and the filmmaker and artist Garrett Bradley (2020 Fellow) will discuss Garrett’s work across narrative, documentary, and experimental modes of filmmaking to address themes such as race, class, familial relationships, social justice, Southern culture, and the history of film in the United States.

This Conversations/Conversazioni, to be presented on Zoom and held in English, is free and open to the public. The start time is 6:00pm Eastern Time (12:00 midnight Central European Time).

The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is the 2020–21 season sponsor of Conversations/Conversazioni: From the American Academy in Rome.

Watch the Video
 

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