Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures Series

Imperialism, Internationalism, and Archaeology in the Un/Making of the Middle East

Monday, November 29, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Composite of three images: color portrait of a light skinned, brown haired woman wearing a dark blazer and white shirt in the center, flanked by two black and white photographs of a crane moving a large stone Egyptian monument of a seated figure

Center: Lynn Meskell (photograph by Eric Sucar); left and right: UNESCO’s Nubian Monuments Campaign, Abu Simbel (photographs courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

Lecture 1

November 29
Imperialism, Internationalism, and Archaeology in the Un/Making of the Middle East
American Academy in Rome
6:00pm

Lecture 2

December 1
A Tale of Two Cities: The Fate of Delhi as UNESCO World Heritage
British School at Rome
6:00pm

Lecture 3

December 7
Engineering Internationalism: Colonialism, the Cold War, and UNESCO’s Victory in Nubia
American Academy in Rome
6:00pm

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. The Jerome Lectures are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2021, the forty-eighth year of the lecture series, Lynn Meskell (2015 Resident), Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor in the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Historic Preservation in the Weitzman School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss the ethics of global heritage and archaeology.

This series, entitled The Ethics of Heritage and Archaeology in Global Perspective, addresses the role of archaeology and heritage within international networks of social and political change from the legacies of colonialism, to Cold War tensions, to the era of neoliberalism. The lectures reveal how the discovery and salvage of sites worldwide has mobilized government, military, and corporate interests, in what Meskell describes as a form of archaeological adventurism. Employing case studies from the Middle East, India, and Europe, Meskell attempts to uncover the dense network of social, political, and economic agendas that are at play in preserving the past.

The first lecture, held on November 29, is entitled Imperialism, Internationalism, and Archaeology in the Un/Making of the Middle East. Archaeological materialities and imaginaries have been deeply entwined with both colonial rivalries and struggles for self-determination that continue to have lasting legacies. Neo-imperial ambitions in the Middle East and conflict over territory, religion, oil, and antiquities have similarly been accompanied by heritage claims. Throughout the twentieth century, foreign occupation and military conflict galvanized archaeological elites.

The second lecture, A Tale of Two Cities: The Fate of Delhi as UNESCO World Heritage, takes place on December 1. In June 2015, a nomination dossier entitled “Delhi’s Imperial Capital Cities,” combining the two imperial capitals of Shahjahanabad and New Delhi, was proposed for the UNESCO World Heritage List. In this lecture, Meskell traces the trajectory of the dossier and events surrounding its withdrawal to reveal the political imbrications of urban conservation, international institutions, neoliberal governance, and colonial histories. She situates Delhi’s heritage within the ambit of neoliberal governance that recalibrates and promotes urban heritage preservation, while similarly encouraging development and economic growth. The episode reveals tensions in this specific political moment over contemporary perceptions of imperial occupation and “foreign” empires, which plagued the dossier from the outset and continue to reverberate in India today. (This lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.)

The final Jerome lecture, on December 7, is entitled Engineering Internationalism: Colonialism, the Cold War, and UNESCO’s Victory in Nubia. Much has been written about UNESCO’s Nubian Campaign, from the heroism and humanism promoted by the agency’s own vast propaganda machine, to the competing narratives of national saviors whether the French or Americans, to Nubia as a theater for the Cold War, down to individual accounts by technocrats, bureaucrats, and archaeologists. What crystallized in UNESCO’s midcentury mission in Nubia was a material attempt to overcome the fissures that were already appearing in their postwar dream of a global peace.

Lynn Meskell was the 2015 American Academy in Rome Scholar in Residence and is currently PIK Professor of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Historic Preservation in the Weitzman School of Design. At the Penn Museum she is curator in the Middle East and Asia sections. She is currently AD White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University (2019–25). Over the last decade Meskell has conducted an institutional ethnography of UNESCO World Heritage, tracing the politics of governance and sovereignty and the subsequent implications for multilateral diplomacy, international conservation, and heritage rights. Employing archival and ethnographic analysis, her award-winning book A Future in Ruins: UNESCO, World Heritage, and the Dream of Peace (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018) reveals UNESCO’s early forays into a one-world archaeology and its later commitments to global heritage.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will, Jerome endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English.

This event, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

The lecture series is co-organized with the British School at Rome.

Black and white logo with the letter B S R and the words British School at Rome

 

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

A Tale of Two Cities: The Fate of Delhi as UNESCO World Heritage

Wednesday, December 1, 2021–6:00 PM
British School at Rome
Via Antonio Gramsci, 61
Rome, Italy
Composite of three images: color portrait of a light skinned, brown haired woman wearing a dark blazer and white shirt in the center, flanked by two black and white photographs of a crane moving a large stone Egyptian monument of a seated figure

Center: Lynn Meskell (photograph by Eric Sucar); left and right: UNESCO’s Nubian Monuments Campaign, Abu Simbel (photographs courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

Lecture 1

November 29
Imperialism, Internationalism, and Archaeology in the Un/Making of the Middle East
American Academy in Rome
6:00pm

Lecture 2

December 1
A Tale of Two Cities: The Fate of Delhi as UNESCO World Heritage
British School at Rome
6:00pm

Lecture 3

December 7
Engineering Internationalism: Colonialism, the Cold War, and UNESCO’s Victory in Nubia
American Academy in Rome
6:00pm

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. The Jerome Lectures are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2021, the forty-eighth year of the lecture series, Lynn Meskell (2015 Resident), Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor in the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Historic Preservation in the Weitzman School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss the ethics of global heritage and archaeology.

This series, entitled The Ethics of Heritage and Archaeology in Global Perspective, addresses the role of archaeology and heritage within international networks of social and political change from the legacies of colonialism, to Cold War tensions, to the era of neoliberalism. The lectures reveal how the discovery and salvage of sites worldwide has mobilized government, military, and corporate interests, in what Meskell describes as a form of archaeological adventurism. Employing case studies from the Middle East, India, and Europe, Meskell attempts to uncover the dense network of social, political, and economic agendas that are at play in preserving the past.

The first lecture, held on November 29, is entitled Imperialism, Internationalism, and Archaeology in the Un/Making of the Middle East. Archaeological materialities and imaginaries have been deeply entwined with both colonial rivalries and struggles for self-determination that continue to have lasting legacies. Neo-imperial ambitions in the Middle East and conflict over territory, religion, oil, and antiquities have similarly been accompanied by heritage claims. Throughout the twentieth century, foreign occupation and military conflict galvanized archaeological elites.

The second lecture, A Tale of Two Cities: The Fate of Delhi as UNESCO World Heritage, takes place on December 1. In June 2015, a nomination dossier entitled “Delhi’s Imperial Capital Cities,” combining the two imperial capitals of Shahjahanabad and New Delhi, was proposed for the UNESCO World Heritage List. In this lecture, Meskell traces the trajectory of the dossier and events surrounding its withdrawal to reveal the political imbrications of urban conservation, international institutions, neoliberal governance, and colonial histories. She situates Delhi’s heritage within the ambit of neoliberal governance that recalibrates and promotes urban heritage preservation, while similarly encouraging development and economic growth. The episode reveals tensions in this specific political moment over contemporary perceptions of imperial occupation and “foreign” empires, which plagued the dossier from the outset and continue to reverberate in India today. (This lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.)

The final Jerome lecture, on December 7, is entitled Engineering Internationalism: Colonialism, the Cold War, and UNESCO’s Victory in Nubia. Much has been written about UNESCO’s Nubian Campaign, from the heroism and humanism promoted by the agency’s own vast propaganda machine, to the competing narratives of national saviors whether the French or Americans, to Nubia as a theater for the Cold War, down to individual accounts by technocrats, bureaucrats, and archaeologists. What crystallized in UNESCO’s midcentury mission in Nubia was a material attempt to overcome the fissures that were already appearing in their postwar dream of a global peace.

Lynn Meskell was the 2015 American Academy in Rome Scholar in Residence and is currently PIK Professor of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Historic Preservation in the Weitzman School of Design. At the Penn Museum she is curator in the Middle East and Asia sections. She is currently AD White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University (2019–25). Over the last decade Meskell has conducted an institutional ethnography of UNESCO World Heritage, tracing the politics of governance and sovereignty and the subsequent implications for multilateral diplomacy, international conservation, and heritage rights. Employing archival and ethnographic analysis, her award-winning book A Future in Ruins: UNESCO, World Heritage, and the Dream of Peace (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018) reveals UNESCO’s early forays into a one-world archaeology and its later commitments to global heritage.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will, Jerome endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English.

This event, to be presented in person (preregistration required) at the British School at Rome as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

The lecture series is co-organized with the British School at Rome.

Black and white logo with the letter B S R and the words British School at Rome

 

Notice

A limited number of in-person spaces at the British School at Rome are available. Everyone attending an event in Rome must preregister via Eventbrite and will be required to present a valid Covid vaccination pass.

Engineering Internationalism: Colonialism, the Cold War, and UNESCO’s Victory in Nubia

Tuesday, December 7, 2021–6:00 PM
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italy
Composite of three images: color portrait of a light skinned, brown haired woman wearing a dark blazer and white shirt in the center, flanked by two black and white photographs of a crane moving a large stone Egyptian monument of a seated figure

Center: Lynn Meskell (photograph by Eric Sucar); left and right: UNESCO’s Nubian Monuments Campaign, Abu Simbel (photographs courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

Lecture 1

November 29
Imperialism, Internationalism, and Archaeology in the Un/Making of the Middle East
American Academy in Rome
6:00pm

Lecture 2

December 1
A Tale of Two Cities: The Fate of Delhi as UNESCO World Heritage
British School at Rome
6:00pm

Lecture 3

December 7
Engineering Internationalism: Colonialism, the Cold War, and UNESCO’s Victory in Nubia
American Academy in Rome
6:00pm

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. The Jerome Lectures are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2021, the forty-eighth year of the lecture series, Lynn Meskell (2015 Resident), Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor in the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Historic Preservation in the Weitzman School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss the ethics of global heritage and archaeology.

This series, entitled The Ethics of Heritage and Archaeology in Global Perspective, addresses the role of archaeology and heritage within international networks of social and political change from the legacies of colonialism, to Cold War tensions, to the era of neoliberalism. The lectures reveal how the discovery and salvage of sites worldwide has mobilized government, military, and corporate interests, in what Meskell describes as a form of archaeological adventurism. Employing case studies from the Middle East, India, and Europe, Meskell attempts to uncover the dense network of social, political, and economic agendas that are at play in preserving the past.

The first lecture, held on November 29, is entitled Imperialism, Internationalism, and Archaeology in the Un/Making of the Middle East. Archaeological materialities and imaginaries have been deeply entwined with both colonial rivalries and struggles for self-determination that continue to have lasting legacies. Neo-imperial ambitions in the Middle East and conflict over territory, religion, oil, and antiquities have similarly been accompanied by heritage claims. Throughout the twentieth century, foreign occupation and military conflict galvanized archaeological elites.

The second lecture, A Tale of Two Cities: The Fate of Delhi as UNESCO World Heritage, takes place on December 1. In June 2015, a nomination dossier entitled “Delhi’s Imperial Capital Cities,” combining the two imperial capitals of Shahjahanabad and New Delhi, was proposed for the UNESCO World Heritage List. In this lecture, Meskell traces the trajectory of the dossier and events surrounding its withdrawal to reveal the political imbrications of urban conservation, international institutions, neoliberal governance, and colonial histories. She situates Delhi’s heritage within the ambit of neoliberal governance that recalibrates and promotes urban heritage preservation, while similarly encouraging development and economic growth. The episode reveals tensions in this specific political moment over contemporary perceptions of imperial occupation and “foreign” empires, which plagued the dossier from the outset and continue to reverberate in India today. (This lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.)

The final Jerome lecture, on December 7, is entitled Engineering Internationalism: Colonialism, the Cold War, and UNESCO’s Victory in Nubia. Much has been written about UNESCO’s Nubian Campaign, from the heroism and humanism promoted by the agency’s own vast propaganda machine, to the competing narratives of national saviors whether the French or Americans, to Nubia as a theater for the Cold War, down to individual accounts by technocrats, bureaucrats, and archaeologists. What crystallized in UNESCO’s midcentury mission in Nubia was a material attempt to overcome the fissures that were already appearing in their postwar dream of a global peace.

Lynn Meskell was the 2015 American Academy in Rome Scholar in Residence and is currently PIK Professor of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Historic Preservation in the Weitzman School of Design. At the Penn Museum she is curator in the Middle East and Asia sections. She is currently AD White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University (2019–25). Over the last decade Meskell has conducted an institutional ethnography of UNESCO World Heritage, tracing the politics of governance and sovereignty and the subsequent implications for multilateral diplomacy, international conservation, and heritage rights. Employing archival and ethnographic analysis, her award-winning book A Future in Ruins: UNESCO, World Heritage, and the Dream of Peace (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018) reveals UNESCO’s early forays into a one-world archaeology and its later commitments to global heritage.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will, Jerome endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English.

This event, to be presented in person at the Academy as well as on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

The lecture series is co-organized with the British School at Rome.

Black and white logo with the letter B S R and the words British School at Rome

 

Notice

Space in the Villa Aurelia is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Signs and Catastrophes

Monday, November 12, 2018–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Signs and Catastrophes

Detail of an Antioch mosaic (526–40 CE) at the Worcester Art Museum

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. They are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2018, the forty-fifth year of the lecture series, Robin Lane Fox, a noted scholar of ancient history, will discuss the natural world in pagan and Christian Rome.

The lectures will explore the differing approaches to the natural world by pagans and the early Christians, from Paul and the Gospels to circa 500 CE. They will bring out differing emphases in their respective writings and art and will ask what practical effects such different ways of seeing had on contemporary life.

The first lecture, “Cosmos and Landscape,” will delve into pagan and Christian views of creation. It will also investigate the dominance of humankind over the beasts and the vegetal world, as well as modern theories of a shift from a horizontal view to a vertical perspective of the relation between the natural world and the divine, which Christianity endorsed. In the second lecture, “Animal and Vegetable,” Lane Fox will address the hierarchy and symbolism of animals and plants in pagan and Christian art. The impact of these views on both groups’ experience, including martyrs and Christian holy men in isolated settings, will be considered. (Please note that the second lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.) The final lecture, “Signs and Catastrophes,” will reflect upon the previous two and compare omens and signs, prodigies and miracles, in pagan and Christian worldviews. A particular focus will be explanations of natural catastrophes, including volcanic and seismic disasters, which are still part of our world today. The lecture will conclude with reflections on the end of the world and the perverted natural symbols used to address it.

Robin Lane Fox is an ancient historian and gardening writer best known for his works on Alexander the Great. He is an emeritus fellow of New College, Oxford, and a reader in ancient history at the University of Oxford. A fellow and tutor in ancient history at New College from 1977 to 2014, Fox now serves as garden master and as extraordinary lecturer in ancient history for both New and Exeter Colleges. His major publications, for which he has won literary prizes, include studies of Alexander the Great and ancient Macedon, Christianity and Paganism, and the Greek Dark Ages. His most recent book, published in 2015, concerns the patristic author Augustine of Hippo. Lane Fox is also the gardening correspondent of the Financial Times.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English.

Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Animal and Vegetable

Thursday, November 8, 2018–6:00 PM
British School at Rome
Via Antonio Gramsci, 61
Rome, Italy
Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Cosmos and Landscape

Detail of an Antioch mosaic (526–40 CE) at the Worcester Art Museum

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. They are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2018, the forty-fifth year of the lecture series, Robin Lane Fox, a noted scholar of ancient history, will discuss the natural world in pagan and Christian Rome.

The lectures will explore the differing approaches to the natural world by pagans and the early Christians, from Paul and the Gospels to circa 500 CE. They will bring out differing emphases in their respective writings and art and will ask what practical effects such different ways of seeing had on contemporary life.

The first lecture, “Cosmos and Landscape,” will delve into pagan and Christian views of creation. It will also investigate the dominance of humankind over the beasts and the vegetal world, as well as modern theories of a shift from a horizontal view to a vertical perspective of the relation between the natural world and the divine, which Christianity endorsed. In the second lecture, “Animal and Vegetable,” Lane Fox will address the hierarchy and symbolism of animals and plants in pagan and Christian art. The impact of these views on both groups’ experience, including martyrs and Christian holy men in isolated settings, will be considered. (Please note that the second lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.) The final lecture, “Signs and Catastrophes,” will reflect upon the previous two and compare omens and signs, prodigies and miracles, in pagan and Christian worldviews. A particular focus will be explanations of natural catastrophes, including volcanic and seismic disasters, which are still part of our world today. The lecture will conclude with reflections on the end of the world and the perverted natural symbols used to address it.

Robin Lane Fox is an ancient historian and gardening writer best known for his works on Alexander the Great. He is an emeritus fellow of New College, Oxford, and a reader in ancient history at the University of Oxford. A fellow and tutor in ancient history at New College from 1977 to 2014, Fox now serves as garden master and as extraordinary lecturer in ancient history for both New and Exeter Colleges. His major publications, for which he has won literary prizes, include studies of Alexander the Great and ancient Macedon, Christianity and Paganism, and the Greek Dark Ages. His most recent book, published in 2015, concerns the patristic author Augustine of Hippo. Lane Fox is also the gardening correspondent of the Financial Times.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English.

Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Cosmos and Landscape

Tuesday, November 6, 2018–6:00 PM
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italy
Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Cosmos and Landscape

Detail of an Antioch mosaic (526–40 CE) at the Worcester Art Museum

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. They are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2018, the forty-fifth year of the lecture series, Robin Lane Fox, a noted scholar of ancient history, will discuss the natural world in pagan and Christian Rome.

The lectures will explore the differing approaches to the natural world by pagans and the early Christians, from Paul and the Gospels to circa 500 CE. They will bring out differing emphases in their respective writings and art and will ask what practical effects such different ways of seeing had on contemporary life.

The first lecture, “Cosmos and Landscape,” will delve into pagan and Christian views of creation. It will also investigate the dominance of humankind over the beasts and the vegetal world, as well as modern theories of a shift from a horizontal view to a vertical perspective of the relation between the natural world and the divine, which Christianity endorsed. In the second lecture, “Animal and Vegetable,” Lane Fox will address the hierarchy and symbolism of animals and plants in pagan and Christian art. The impact of these views on both groups’ experience, including martyrs and Christian holy men in isolated settings, will be considered. (Please note that the second lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.) The final lecture, “Signs and Catastrophes,” will reflect upon the previous two and compare omens and signs, prodigies and miracles, in pagan and Christian worldviews. A particular focus will be explanations of natural catastrophes, including volcanic and seismic disasters, which are still part of our world today. The lecture will conclude with reflections on the end of the world and the perverted natural symbols used to address it.

Robin Lane Fox is an ancient historian and gardening writer best known for his works on Alexander the Great. He is an emeritus fellow of New College, Oxford, and a reader in ancient history at the University of Oxford. A fellow and tutor in ancient history at New College from 1977 to 2014, Fox now serves as garden master and as extraordinary lecturer in ancient history for both New and Exeter Colleges. His major publications, for which he has won literary prizes, include studies of Alexander the Great and ancient Macedon, Christianity and Paganism, and the Greek Dark Ages. His most recent book, published in 2015, concerns the patristic author Augustine of Hippo. Lane Fox is also the gardening correspondent of the Financial Times.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English.

Maurizio Bettini – The Invention of a Roman God: Anthropology and Roman Religion

Monday, June 20, 2016–6:00 PM–Friday, June 24, 2016–8:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Maurizio Bettini - The Invention of a Roman God: Anthropology and Roman Religion

The Jerome Lectures are one of the most prestigious international lecture series for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture and are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2016, the 44th year of the Lectures, noted Classical philologist Maurizio Bettini will discuss the invention and identity of one of the most fascinating gods of the Roman/Etruscan world: Vertumnus, the god of change. Integrating anthropology and the history of Roman religion, Bettini will present three lectures, each of which offers a different view of Vertumnus, the Roman/Etruscan god associated with transformations of all kinds.

Lecture I

Autobiography of Vertumnus I: The God of Change
Monday 20 June, 6pm
The first lecture centers on a celebrated Elegy of Propertius, in which the god Vertumnus is introduced as a persona loquens reciting a sort of autobiography. Vertumnus describes himself as a god presiding over any possible form of change (vertere = to change): from the turning of the seasons to the ripening of fruits, from the power of diverting a river’s course to the practice of metamorphosis.

Lecture II

Autobiography of Vertumnus II: The God of Perpetual Metamorphosis
Wednesday 22 June, 6pm
The second lecture questions the identity of Vertumnus, a god defined by maleability. Is Vertumnus the god of a single identity, or does this figure instead possess multiple identities at once? Such questions were integral to Roman society, where social and personal identities existed within a rigid hierarchy.

Lecture III

Many Vertumni: Gods, Grammar and Fractals
Friday 24 June, 5:30pm
The third and final lecture considers Vertumnus in the plural, a proposition first put forward by Horace. Debating the multiplicity of Vertumnus, or Vertumni, this lecture highlights how ancient gods were awarded the privilege of being singular and plural at once, a status that ignores the linguistic categories that grammar imposes on ordinary mortals.

Maurizio Bettini is a Professor of Classical Philology at Università degli Studi di Siena. He has published extensively on anthropology in ancient Rome (The Portrait of the Lover, trans. L. Gibbs, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1999; Anthropology and Roman Culture, trans. J. Van Sickle, Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991) and on the role of myth in antiquity (C’era una volta il mito, Sellerio 2007).

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864-1914) was an American lawyer and lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome and delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English. You can watch this event on live stream at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Maria Wyke – Ancient Rome in Silent Cinema

Monday, April 13, 2015–6:00 PM–Monday, April 20, 2015–8:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room and Museo Nazionale Romano di Palazzo Altemps
, Italy
Maria Wyke – Ancient Rome in Silent Cinema

In recent years, Hollywood has released a number of big-budget films set in antiquity, from Gladiator (2000) to Pompeii (2014). Yet cinema has been fascinated with the ancient world—and with Roman history in particular—since it emerged as a new technology more than one hundred years ago. The persistent presence of ancient Rome in early cinema compels us to ask: why did so modern a medium have so strong an interest in antiquity right from its start? What did ancient Rome do for cinema? And what did cinema do for ancient Rome?

Maria Wyke, a noted scholar of Latin literature, will address these questions and more in the 2015 Jerome Lectures, The Ancient World in Silent Cinema. In the 43rd year of the Lecture series, this year will include three lectures, with introductions by Alessandro Schiesaro (La Sapienza Università di Roma) and Alessandra Capodiferro (SS-Col, Museo Nazionale Romano di Palazzo Altemps) and, for the first time, a screening of the silent film, The Last Days of Pompeii (1913), with intertitles in English and Italian and live piano accompaniment by Stefano Maccagno.

The first lecture will set the scene for more detailed discussion of the three national film industries that reconstructed their own versions of ancient Rome on screen from the 1890s through the arrival of sound in the 1920s—France, Italy, and the United States. Subjects addressed will include the relationship of early cinema’s Rome with the Rome of other nineteenth-century arts, both high (theatre, opera, dance, painting, the novel) and popular (circus shows, pyrodramas, puppetry and magic acts); the development of cinematic technologies for the reconstruction of Roman history; the use of Rome on film to stimulate a collective national and imperial consciousness; and the cinematic reconstruction of the Roman past to explore—and challenge—modern concerns about religion, politics, ethics, class, gender and sexuality, as well as the new medium itself.

All events are free and open to the public. All lectures will be given in English.

About Maria Wyke, 2015 Jerome Lecturer

Maria Wyke is Professor of Latin at University College London. She has written extensively on Roman love poetry and ancient gender and sexuality, on the reception of Julius Caesar in Western culture (Caesar: A Life in Western Culture, 2007; Caesar in the USA, 2012), and on ancient Rome in cinema (Projecting the Past: Ancient Rome, Cinema and History, 1997; ed., with P. Michelakis, The Ancient World in Silent Cinema, 2013). Most recently she has co-authored with Christopher Pelling a short work that explores why classical literature still has relevance today, Twelve Voices from Greece and Rome: Ancient Ideas for Modern Times (2014).

About the Jerome Lectures

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864-1914) was an American lawyer and lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, and delivered at both institutions. The Jerome Lectures have become one of the most prestigious international lecture series for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

Monday, 13 April 2015
6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture I
Introduction, Alessandro Schiesaro (La Sapienza Università di Roma)
France 1890s to 1910s: experimentation and aesthetics

Wednesday, 15 April 2015
5:30pm, Museo Nazionale Romano di Palazzo Altemps
Via di Sant'Apollinare, 8
Lecture II - Film Screening
Introduction, Alessandra Capodiferro (SS-Col, Museo Nazionale Romano di Palazzo Altemps)
a screening of the silent film, The Last Days of Pompeii (1913), with intertitles in English and Italian and live piano accompaniment by Stefano Maccagno.

Friday, 17 April 2015
6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture III
Italy 1910s: national consciousness

Monday, 20 April 2015
6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture IV
America 1910s to 1920s: morality and subversion

In collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale per il Colosseo, il Museo Nazionale Romano e l’Area
archeologica di Roma - Museo Nazionale Romano di Palazzo Altemps.

Aldo Schiavone – Ancient and Modern Equality

Monday, February 24, 2014–6:00 PM–Wednesday, March 5, 2014–8:00 PM
Villa Aurelia and AAR Lecture Room
, Italy
Aldo Schiavone - Ancient and Modern Equality

The Jerome Lectures are one of the most prestigious international lecture series for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture and are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2014, the forty-second year of the lectures, the eminent historian Aldo Schiavone of the Scuola Normale Superiore will discuss equality in the ancient and modern worlds.

The idea of equality is one of the constituent features of Western identity. Bound up within it in an almost inextricable fashion are the legacy of the classical world and modern thought, the ancient polis and industrial society. The aim of the lectures is to outline a genealogy of this character, beginning with two elements that made its birth possible: the invention of politics and democracy by the Greeks, and the invention of law by the Romans. These were the two paradigms that enabled the modern construction of equality through the great revolutions of the eighteenth century in America and France. And it is from them that we must begin if we wish to ask ourselves what the future of this decisive experience will be.

Schiavone is professor of Roman law at the Scuola Normale Superiore. He has served as rettore of the Istituto Italiano di Scienze Umane in Florence, head of faculty in the school of jurisprudence at the Università di Firenze, and director of the Fondazione Istituto Gramsci. Schiavone has been visiting faculty member at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and the Collège de France, and in the United States, has been a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has published widely in the field of Roman law as well as on Roman history and Italian cultural history and criticism. He was the coeditor of the canonical Storia di Roma series and the author of many monographs including Ius. L'invenzione del diritto in Occidente/The Invention of Law in the West, La storia spezzata. Roma antica e occidente moderno/The End of the Past: Ancient Rome and the Modern West and most recently, Spartacus.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, and delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

Monday, February 24, 2014

6pm, Villa Aurelia
Lecture I
L'invenzione greca della democrazia (in italiano)

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture II
The Roman Invention of Law (in English)

Introduction: Elio Lo Cascio, Università di Roma "La Sapienza"

Friday, February 28, 2014

11:00am, AAR Lecture Room
Seminar Discussion
Slavery in the First Book of Aristotle’s “Politics”/Schiavitú nel primo libro di “La Politica” de Aristotele
To participate, please contact Kim Bowes at kimberly.bowes [at] aarome.org

Monday, March 3, 2014

6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture III
Economy and Inequality (in English)

Introduction: Andrea Giardina, Scuola Normale Superiore

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture IV
Il mondo globale: nuovi problemi e vecchie risposte (in italiano)

David Mattingly – Africa under Rome: Relationships, Identities, and Cultural Trajectories

Thursday, February 21, 2013–6:00 PM–Friday, March 1, 2013–8:00 PM
Villa Aurelia and AAR Lecture Room
, Italy
Africa under Rome: Relationships, Identities and Cultural Trajectories

The Jerome Lectures are one of the most prestigious international series for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture and are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2013, the forty-first year of the lecture series, the eminent archaeologist and historian David Mattingly of Leicester University, will offer new interpretations on the interactions between the Roman Empire and the indigenous peoples of North Africa.

The consensus view of Africa in the Roman empire has tended to be closely aligned with the view from Rome and is heavily focused on the hundreds of urban sites, the huge volume of Latin epigraphy and the many extraordinary classical artworks. David Mattingly’s lectures will follow a different transect across the African landscape, using the concept of identity to explore inter- and intracommunal differences in behaviour and material culture in Roman Africa.

The lectures embrace the great swath of territory from the central Sahara to the coast spanning western Libya and eastern Algeria—the desert to the sea—during the last centuries BC and early centuries AD. The series starts with an overview of Africa and its varied populations in the pre-Roman period, contrasting the ancient historical and geographical sources with newly emerging archaeological evidence. The rest of the series looks at the relationship of three broad cultural communities with the Roman state: the army, the rural populations and townspeople. The second lecture focuses on the military community, reconsidering the development of the Roman frontier, the role of the army in Africa and the cultural self-definition of the garrison settlements and how and why these differed from indigenous settlements in the frontier zone. The third lecture explores the diverse histories, economic trajectories and cultural attributes of rural communities, asking to what extent these can be attributed to pre-Roman regional diversity or to active agency in response to Rome’s massive impact on land-use and landholding. The final lecture examines different types of urban biography in Africa and the possible explanations for the diversity detected.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, and delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

Thursday 21 February 2013
6pm, Villa Aurelia
Lecture I
Cultural Encounters in 1st Millennium BC Africa: Romans, Liby-Phoenicians and Libyans
Presenter: Christopher S. Celenza, FAAR'94, Director, American Academy in Rome

Saturday 23 February 2013
Seminar Discussion
Romanisation and Discrepant Identity: a visit to the exhibition Roma Caput Mundi and discussion
To participate, please contact Kim Bowes at kimberly.bowes [at] aarome.org

Monday 25 February 2013
6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture II
Pacifying, Protecting, Policing, Posturing? The Military Community in Roman Africa
Presenter: Elizabeth Fentress, President, AIAC

Wednesday 27 February 2013
6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture III
A World of Difference: Rural Communities in Africa under Rome
Presenter: Kimberly Bowes, FAAR'06, Andrew W. Mellon Professor, American Academy in Rome

Friday 1 March 2013
6pm, AAR Lecture Room
Lecture IV
Africa in the Roman Empire: Urban Identities and Urban Trajectories
Presenter: Luisa Musso, Professore, Università degli Studi Roma Tre

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