Fellow Shoptalks

Abinadi Meza – Silence Goes Faster Backwards, the Difference Is Spreading

Monday, December 1, 2014–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Kim Karlsrud & Daniel Phillips - Creative Ecologies

Abinadi Meza, the Gilmore D. Clarke/Michael Rapuano Rome Prize in Visual Arts and assistant professor in the School of Art at the University of Houston, will give his shoptalk entitled Silence Goes Faster Backwards, the Difference Is Spreading.

You can watch this event at https://new.livestream.com/aarome/events/3600005.

Abigail DeVille – Only When It’s Dark Enough Can You See the Stars

Thursday, May 3, 2018–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Abigail DeVille – Only When It’s Dark Enough Can you See the Stars

Abigail DeVille will discuss the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “Mountaintop Speech” as a point of direct inspiration, visual cues, and time travel through space and time into the interior of black holes.

DeVille is the Chuck Close/Henry W. and Marian T. Mitchell Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome. She lives and works in Fort Lee, New Jersey.

The event will be held in English. You can watch it live at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Denis Robichaud & Basil Twist

Monday, October 29, 2018–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Events - Fellow Shoptalks 2018-19

Denis Robichaud
“A Halloween Mask for Socrates: On Socrates in the Italian Renaissance”

Despite his never writing a word for posterity, the influence of Socrates has extended far beyond his Athenian conversational partners. Just as a myriad of philosophers have seen themselves in the image of Socrates, they in turn have shaped Socrates into their own image. Denis Robichaud will discuss how Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499) revived Platonism in the Italian Renaissance and decisively transformed how the figure of Socrates was understood.

Robichaud is the Phyllis W. G. Gordan/National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and associate professor in the program of liberal studies at the University of Notre Dame.

Basil Twist
“The Sacred and Sensual Roots of Puppetry”

Basil Twist will talk about his explorations in and around the phenomenon of puppetry; between abstraction and representation, animism and fetichism. He'll talk about his project here in Rome and resonances he is finding with postwar Italian visual artists. He will also demonstrate some simple acts of animation.

Twist is the Jesse Howard Jr./Henry W. and Marian T. Mitchell Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and artistic director of the Dream Music Puppetry Program at HERE Arts Center in New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Watch this event live at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Nicolás Leong & Virginia Virilli

Monday, May 6, 2019–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Virginia Virilli is the 2019 Italian Fellow in literature

Nicolás Leong
Recent Work, in Context

The Los Angeles–based artist Nicolás Leong will discuss his recent photographic explorations in and around Rome, and how they relate to his previous and ongoing efforts to picture the world.

Nicholás Leong is the Abigail Cohen Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts.

Virginia Virilli
Women

The Rome-based writer Virginia Virilli will read extracts from her book Le ossa del Gabibbo (Feltrinelli, 2012) and from her theater plays to show how a recurring theme, “woman” in this case, is frequently growing along with the author.

Virginia Virilli is the Italian Fellow in literature.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Watch the video

Ashley Hahn & Christine Gorby

Monday, November 18, 2019–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Ashley Hahn

Ashley Hahn
Preservation and the Life between Buildings

Preserving a place is about more than conserving the physical fabric of buildings or monuments—it requires deliberate care for the life between buildings as well. But what does it mean to make public life a preservation concern, and what is at stake? Why are some places “sticky” and others are not? What lessons does Rome have to share? This talk will touch on past work and explore a project in progress, weaving together ideas about civic virtue and the public good, social science studies of public space, preservation approaches to cultural heritage, and the urgency of this work in our era of hyper fragmentation and fragile civic infrastructures.

Ashley Hahn is the Adele Chatfield-Taylor Rome Prize Fellow in Historic Preservation and a conservation and writer based in Philadelphia.

Christine Gorby
Writing, Inherited Tradition, and Design: Robert Venturi’s “Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture”

How does the study of manuscripts lead to a deeper understanding of a written work? Examining the twenty-six drafts that the Philadelphia-based architect Robert Venturi wrote during a ten-year period for his influential 1966 book Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture yields new ideas and interpretations about its provenance and progression not evident in the final form. Their study helps to answer why Venturi wrote the text and unearths the broad cultural sources from which it arose. Tensions are embodied in the drafts as it author shaped them (with others) through hefty alterations to texts, bibliographies, and images. Perhaps the most palpable and poignant of these revisions come from the iterative writing-design process Venturi employed to develop the book. Ultimately, this is a painful struggle to understand and relay the meanings of his buildings for himself and to a broader public.

Christine Gorby is the Rome Prize Fellow in Architecture and associate professor in the Department of Architecture at Pennsylvania State University.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Watch the video

Fiori Berhane & Garrett Bradley

Monday, January 13, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Still from Garrett Bradley’s 2019 film America (artwork © Garrett Bradley)

Fiori Berhane
From Revolution to Human Rights: Eritrean Refugees, Decolonization, and the Migration Crisis

In the talk Fiori Berhane will give an overview of her research on Eritrean refugees, the history of EPLF organizing efforts in Bologna, and recent wider transformations around the international refugee regime.

Berhane is the Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Brown University.

Garrett Bradley
Public Symbols and Singular Narratives

In the talk, Garrett Bradley will discuss her interest around the the complexity of narrative within singular space and her inquires of this within the context of film, installation, and sound.

Bradley is the Philip Guston Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and an artist based in New Orleans.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Watch the video

Angelo Caglioti & Nicole Sealey

Monday, February 17, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Nicole Sealey (photograph by Rachel Eliza Griffiths)

Angelo Caglioti
(Re)covering the Empire: Environmental History and the Palimpsest of Italian Colonialism

The talk will use the approach of environmental history as a method to recover the memory of Italian colonialism in Africa. By drawing on the metaphor of the “palimpsest,” it will examine Italy’s colonial past as a set of moments and narratives that have been “overwritten” by different regimes, thus covering the goals and strategies of Italian imperialism in the liberal, fascist, and republican period.

Angelo Caglioti is the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/National Endowment for the Humanities Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and an assistant professor in the Department of History at Columbia University’s Barnard College.

Nicole Sealey
Investigation of the Ferguson Police Department: Lyric Erasures

Investigation of the Ferguson Police Department: Lyric Erasure is a revisionist project in that, while the Ferguson report details a familiar history of racial biases and police brutality, the erasure reimagines and repurposes that history. This talk will focus on Nicole Sealey’s impulse to as well as the context and creative process of drafting these lyric erasures.

Sealey is the recipient of the John Guare Writer’s Fund Rome Prize in Literature, a gift of Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman, and a 2019–20 Hodder Fellow at Princeton University.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Watch the video

Joel Pattison & Brian Davis

Monday, February 10, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Brian Davis, Prince Charitable Trusts/Kate Lancaster Brewster Rome Prize Fellow in Landscape Architecture

Joel Pattison
Serving God and Mammon: Genoese Merchants in the Medieval Maghrib

In this talk, Joel Pattison will discuss his ongoing research into the importance of religious law—both Christian and Muslim—in structuring economic exchange between Genoa and the Maghrib during the thirteenth century. 

Pattison is the Marian and Andrew Heiskell Rome Prize Fellow in Medieval Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley.

Brian Davis
A More Common Ground

Mud stands alongside water itself as the most basic of landscape materials. If we have taken this material for granted in the past, it is only because it is so fundamental that we cannot imagine our favorite places without it. In this talk, the landscape architect Brian Davis will propose that sediment offers a way to create a new public good in response to contemporary social and environmental crises. He will briefly situate this idea in the history of modern landscape architecture and a longer history of landscape making, and will discuss some of the practical and aesthetic implications of this possibility.

Davis is the Prince Charitable Trusts/Kate Lancaster Brewster Rome Prize Fellow in Landscape Architecture and associate professor for the Department of Landscape Architecture in the School of Architecture at the University of Virginia.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Watch the video

Evan A. MacCarthy & Jennifer Pastore

Monday, May 2, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a bright green background

Evan MacCarthy
Musica est scientia: Ugolino of Orvieto’s Fifteenth-Century Compendium of Musical Thought

The composer, singer, and music theorist Ugolino of Orvieto (ca. 1380–1452) completed his 750-page treatise on music in the 1430s, while serving as archpriest of the Cathedral of Ferrara. This summa on all aspects of musical learning situates ancient and medieval writers, alongside contemporary commentators. Celebrated in his own day as one who would surpass all other musicians, Ugolino bridged a long-established divide between abstract, speculative thought about the harmony of the spheres and the practicalities of musical notation, composition, and singing. Evan MacCarthy’s shoptalk will introduce Ugolino, his treatise, and what we know about the early readers of this text and its later reception, while surveying some of the methods and challenges of editing and translating this important compendium of late medieval musical thought.

Evan MacCarthy is the 2020 National Endowment for the Humanities Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and early modern studies and Five College Visiting Assistant Professor of music history in the Department of Music and Dance at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Jennifer Pastore
Italian Needlecraft Traditions and Family Narrative

After spending more than twenty years working as a director of photography in the deadline-driven magazine world, Jennifer Pastore is using her Rome Prize Fellowship to recalibrate her mind and body, and to research some of the slowest forms of storytelling—oral reminiscing and needlecraft work—within families. Through research into family reminiscing styles, specifically maternal reminiscing, she is learning how elaborative intergenerational storytelling influences children’s (and later adult’s) autobiographical understanding and emotional resilience. Pastore is interested in how traditional Italian embroidery, and the almost extinct practice of making biancheria (i.e., hand-embroidered linens) and the wedding corredo (i.e., trousseau), enabled the sharing of family traditions and narratives and built a sense of intergenerational kinship. She will interview those who continue to make biancheria by hand (or those who have received these as heirlooms) and learn how, in the past, the practice of embroidery provided emotional space for family storytelling and the continuation of a craft tradition. Pastore will make her own biancheria for her family using thrifted antique linens, creating designs that speak to this time in her family life.

Jennifer Pastore is the Mark Hampton/Jesse Howard Jr. Rome Prize Fellow in Design and executive photography director at WSJ. The Wall Street Journal Magazine, published by Dow Jones in New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English. They will not be streamed on Zoom.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Gloria Bell & Erene Rafik Morcos

Monday, February 21, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a solid magenta background

Gloria Bell
Notes from Rome: Walking with Edmonia Lewis

In this presentation Gloria Bell will share a series of notes and reflections from working in Rome and tracing the studio spaces and haunts of artist Edmonia Lewis. She will talk about some inspirations, challenges, and future directions.

Gloria Bell is the Terra Foundation Affiliated Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and assistant professor in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University.

Erene Rafik Morcos
… διά χειρὸς τοῦ πολυαμαρτήτου Ῥωμανοῦ … by the hand of the great sinner Romanos …

Romanos of Ullano was a bilingual scribe active in the late thirteenth century. Among his surviving output are three Greco-Latin Psalters dating from the years he sought refuge in Rossano from pirate raids threatening his monastic community in Reggio Calabria. Bringing these three handwritten books of Psalms into conversation, Erene Rafik Morcos will chart their varied approaches to manuscript production along with the diverging, colorful afterlives they have enjoyed. Doing so will allow us to contemplate not only how they elegantly exemplify the whole subgenre of multilingual codices, but also how they shed light on medieval social plurality.

Erene Rafik Morcos is the Samuel H. Kress Foundation/Donald and Maria Cox Rome Prize Fellow in Medieval Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

You can watch the shoptalks live. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

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