Fellow Shoptalks

Manuele Cerutti & Mary Ellen Carroll

Monday, April 11, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a solid magenta background

Manuele Cerutti
Simplicity of Regard

Manuele Cerutti’s presentation is directed to illustrate what he considers a central trait of his pictorial research, namely, simplicity of regard: an attitude he has increasingly tried to adopt and maintain in front of the objects, of certain objects. The focus is their “subjectivity” and the strange relationship between subject and object that descend from this acknowledgment. Cerutti will document briefly the phases of this research, starting from the works where objects are the only characters; more recently, the human figure is present again, in an aura (he hopes) of enlarged subjectivity. On the ground, the idea that a satisfying history of the relations between animate and inanimate worlds has yet to be written.

Manuele Cerutti is the Fondazione Sviluppo e Crescita CRT Italian Fellow in Visual Arts and an artist based in Turin.

Mary Ellen Carroll
The Stone is More Stone than Before

Mary Ellen Carroll will present research and new works being developed while at the Academy, as well as the materiality in a work of art and unsuspecting matter: lithium and radio frequency. Revolution, extraction, and reconstitution as historical and contemporary processes in Rome, and works in Carroll’s oeuvre, will be discussed. Additionally, the ongoing work of the initiative DYKWTCA on migration and asylum will be touched on briefly, as will a new composition and performance based on the writing and political engagement of Natalia Ginzburg.

Mary Ellen Carroll is the Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Rome Prize Fellow in Design and principal at MEC, studios, in New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English. They will not be streamed on Zoom.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Mary Jane Dempsey & John Izzo

Wednesday, April 6, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a solid red background

Mary Jane Dempsey
Remember to Forget: Journeying toward a Dissertation

In this talk, Mary Jane Dempsey will introduce her dissertation project before focusing on the specific research she has conducted during this Fellowship year.

Mary Jane Dempsey is the Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Romance Languages at Cornell University.

John Izzo
Tiro’s Ghost: Atlantic Slavery, Race, and a Roman Freedman

John Izzo is writing a dissertation on Marcus Tullius Tiro, a Roman freedman who had formerly been enslaved to Cicero. For his shoptalk, he will be discussing Tiro’s afterlives in the contexts of slavery and race in a number of sources from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries.

John Izzo is the Millicent Mercer Johnsen Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at Columbia University.

The shoptalks will be held in English. They will not be streamed on Zoom.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SA Smythe & William Villalongo

Tuesday, March 29, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a bright green background

William Villalongo
In Search of Black Atlantis

William Villalongo will introduce his artistic practice and share research from his ongoing In Search of Black Atlantis project, highlighting his process, finished works, and collaborations done while in residence at AAR.

William Villalongo is the Jules Guerin/Harold M. English Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and associate professor in the School of Art at Cooper Union.

SA Smythe

SA Smythe is the Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and assistant professor in the Department of Gender Studies and African American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

You can watch William Villalongo’s shoptalk live. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Sarah Nunberg & Valzhyna Mort

Monday, April 4, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a light purple background

Sarah Nunberg
Sustainability Tools in Cultural Heritage: A New Mindset

Sustainability Tools in Cultural Heritage (STiCH) provides tools for making informed choices to reduce your carbon footprint. Sarah Nunberg’s talk will introduce the tools and consider the barriers to changing mindsets toward sustainable practices and consumption reduction. During the presentation all attendees will have the opportunity to use the calculator during the demonstration. Please bring your laptops (charged) and open to the link stich.culturalheritage.org.

Sarah Nunberg is the Adele Chatfield-Taylor Rome Prize Fellow in Historic Preservation and Conservation and visiting professor in the Department of Math and Science at Pratt Institute.

Valzhyna Mort
30 Minutes’ Worth of Bones

The poet and translator Valzhyna Mort will read works from her recent collection, Music for the Dead and Resurrected, and speak about a lyrical voice in the time of crisis. Music for the Dead and Resurrected, winner of the International Griffin Poetry Prize, was a New York Times selection for “The Best Poetry of 2020.” This collection illuminates life in the shadows of imperial forces, speaking through familiar trauma with grotesque humor, looking with more than the eyes.

Valzhyna Mort is the Rome Prize Fellow in Literature and associate professor in the Department of English at Cornell University.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

You can watch Sarah Nunberg’s shoptalk live. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Allison Emmerson & Michael Saltarella

Monday, February 4, 2019–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Orcus mouth in the Garden of Bomarzo (photograph by Alessio Damato with a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license)

Allison Emmerson
Pestilence, Paupers, and Puticuli: Reconsidering Rome’s Esquiline Suburb

Nineteenth-century excavations on the Esquiline Hill uncovered something truly shocking: puticuli, mass graves filled with the remains of Republican Rome’s poorest residents, who had been tossed out like garbage to pollute the suburb immediately outside the city walls. In the past century and a half, the idea of mass graves on the Esquiline has become canonical. This talk problematizes and reinterprets the finds, encouraging new understandings of Roman urbanism and infrastructure in the Republican period.

Allison Emmerson is the Emeline Hill Richardson Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and assistant professor in the Department of Classical Studies at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Michael Saltarella
Deviant Landscapes: Irregularity and the Formal Garden

The emotional resonance of gardens such as Bomarzo is uncanny, transcending genre and time, and reaching us on an intuitive level. Sinister monsters loom over the valley seemingly set on the destruction of order, a clear deviation from the rigid formality of the Renaissance garden. Today landscapes are supposed to “function” and “perform,” and there is not much talk of monsters or emotions. This talk will investigate the subtle and not so subtle irregularities in formal gardens throughout Italy, and how these irregularities can contribute to the emotional complexity and overall experience of the landscape.

Michael Saltarella is the Prince Charitable Trusts/Kate Lancaster Brewster Rome Prize Fellow in Landscape Architecture and an associate at Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Watch Allison Emmerson’s shoptalk live at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Tina Tallon & Lillian Datchev

Wednesday, May 4, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a light purple background

Tina Tallon
Shrill

The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw unprecedented development in technologies used to mediate the human voice, leading to a revolution in how information has been stored, transmitted, accessed, and understood over the past one hundred years. Early biased design choices in these technologies have led to interconnected inequitable path dependencies across many industries, ultimately creating imbalances in whose stories are told and how. Through a discussion of recent works, Tina Tallon will place both her technical research and creative practice in the context of this history, imagining how electronic music can offer reparative modes of engaging with flawed technologies and hopefully, paths toward synthesizing more equitable futures.

Tina Tallon is the Frederic A. Juilliard/Walter Damrosch Rome Prize Fellow in Musical Composition and assistant professor in the School of Music and assistant professor of AI and the arts in the College of the Arts at the University of Florida.

Lillian Datchev
The Origins of Antiquarian Scholarship

In the early Renaissance, scholars began to study antiquity in new ways. They examined and recorded ancient Greek and Roman inscriptions they found on old buildings, decaying monuments, and broken marbles. They made drawings of ancient temples and statues from observation. They took measurements and mapped lost cities. The level of detail and the large scale which these fifteenth-century scholars, such as Poggio Bracciolini and Ciriaco d’Ancona, achieved across their studies of the past were unprecedented and led to long-term changes in European scholarship. How and why did this intellectual transformation occur? The origins are not as bookish as we might think.

Lillian Datchev is the Marian and Andrew Heiskell/Anthony M. Clark Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of History at Princeton University.

The shoptalks will be held in English. They will not be streamed.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Diana Garvin – The Bean in the Machine

Monday, March 26, 2018–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Diana Garvin - The Bean in the Machine

Italian coffee culture grew up with Fascism: new commercial trade routes linked East African farmers to Northern Italian vendors, establishing transnational commercial imbalances writ in beans and machines. To demonstrate how dictatorial politics transformed caffè culture, this talk will use colonial commodities (coffee beans) to examine how artistic aesthetics (Futurism and Primitivism) shaped industrial design (espresso machines and ceramic cups). At stake in this research is a larger question: How do you study far-right politics without reifying their discriminatory power structures? In other words, how do you research something ugly?

Diana Garvin is the Paul Mellon/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and assistant professor in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon.

The event will be held in English.

Evan A. MacCarthy & Jennifer Pastore

Monday, May 2, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a bright green background

Evan MacCarthy
Musica est scientia: Ugolino of Orvieto’s Fifteenth-Century Compendium of Musical Thought

The composer, singer, and music theorist Ugolino of Orvieto (ca. 1380–1452) completed his 750-page treatise on music in the 1430s, while serving as archpriest of the Cathedral of Ferrara. This summa on all aspects of musical learning situates ancient and medieval writers, alongside contemporary commentators. Celebrated in his own day as one who would surpass all other musicians, Ugolino bridged a long-established divide between abstract, speculative thought about the harmony of the spheres and the practicalities of musical notation, composition, and singing. Evan MacCarthy’s shoptalk will introduce Ugolino, his treatise, and what we know about the early readers of this text and its later reception, while surveying some of the methods and challenges of editing and translating this important compendium of late medieval musical thought.

Evan MacCarthy is the 2020 National Endowment for the Humanities Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and early modern studies and Five College Visiting Assistant Professor of music history in the Department of Music and Dance at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Jennifer Pastore
Italian Needlecraft Traditions and Family Narrative

After spending more than twenty years working as a director of photography in the deadline-driven magazine world, Jennifer Pastore is using her Rome Prize Fellowship to recalibrate her mind and body, and to research some of the slowest forms of storytelling—oral reminiscing and needlecraft work—within families. Through research into family reminiscing styles, specifically maternal reminiscing, she is learning how elaborative intergenerational storytelling influences children’s (and later adult’s) autobiographical understanding and emotional resilience. Pastore is interested in how traditional Italian embroidery, and the almost extinct practice of making biancheria (i.e., hand-embroidered linens) and the wedding corredo (i.e., trousseau), enabled the sharing of family traditions and narratives and built a sense of intergenerational kinship. She will interview those who continue to make biancheria by hand (or those who have received these as heirlooms) and learn how, in the past, the practice of embroidery provided emotional space for family storytelling and the continuation of a craft tradition. Pastore will make her own biancheria for her family using thrifted antique linens, creating designs that speak to this time in her family life.

Jennifer Pastore is the Mark Hampton/Jesse Howard Jr. Rome Prize Fellow in Design and executive photography director at WSJ. The Wall Street Journal Magazine, published by Dow Jones in New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English. They will not be streamed on Zoom.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Gloria Bell & Erene Rafik Morcos

Monday, February 21, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a solid magenta background

Gloria Bell
Notes from Rome: Walking with Edmonia Lewis

In this presentation Gloria Bell will share a series of notes and reflections from working in Rome and tracing the studio spaces and haunts of artist Edmonia Lewis. She will talk about some inspirations, challenges, and future directions.

Gloria Bell is the Terra Foundation Affiliated Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and assistant professor in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University.

Erene Rafik Morcos
… διά χειρὸς τοῦ πολυαμαρτήτου Ῥωμανοῦ … by the hand of the great sinner Romanos …

Romanos of Ullano was a bilingual scribe active in the late thirteenth century. Among his surviving output are three Greco-Latin Psalters dating from the years he sought refuge in Rossano from pirate raids threatening his monastic community in Reggio Calabria. Bringing these three handwritten books of Psalms into conversation, Erene Rafik Morcos will chart their varied approaches to manuscript production along with the diverging, colorful afterlives they have enjoyed. Doing so will allow us to contemplate not only how they elegantly exemplify the whole subgenre of multilingual codices, but also how they shed light on medieval social plurality.

Erene Rafik Morcos is the Samuel H. Kress Foundation/Donald and Maria Cox Rome Prize Fellow in Medieval Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

You can watch the shoptalks live. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Phoebe Lickwar & Firelei Báez

Monday, January 17, 2022–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with '2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk' in white letters against a solid red background

Phoebe Lickwar

Phoebe Lickwar is the Garden Club of America Rome Prize Fellow in Landscape Architecture and associate professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin.

Firelei Báez

Firelei Báez is the Philip Guston Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and an artist based in the Bronx, New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Super Green Pass
  • FFP2 masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

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