Fellow Shoptalks

Fiori Berhane & Garrett Bradley

Monday, January 13, 2020–6:00 PM

Still from Garrett Bradley’s 2019 film America (artwork © Garrett Bradley)

Fiori Berhane
From Revolution to Human Rights: Eritrean Refugees, Decolonization, and the Migration Crisis

In the talk Fiori Berhane will give an overview of her research on Eritrean refugees, the history of EPLF organizing efforts in Bologna, and recent wider transformations around the international refugee regime.

Berhane is the Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Brown University.

Garrett Bradley
Public Symbols and Singular Narratives

In the talk, Garrett Bradley will discuss her interest around the the complexity of narrative within singular space and her inquires of this within the context of film, installation, and sound.

Bradley is the Philip Guston Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and an artist based in New Orleans.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Watch the Livestream
 

Christopher van den Berg & Kate Thomas

Monday, January 20, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Color photograph of Kate Thomas drinking a beverage from a large white ceramic mug

Kate Thomas

Christopher van den Berg
Fighting with Statues: Venus, Minerva, and Rome's Civil War

This talk discusses how Cicero, during Rome’s Civil War (49–46 BCE), harnessed the symbolism of Minerva, goddess of wisdom and protectress of Athens and Rome, against Julius Caesar’s genealogical connection to Venus, goddess of love. It focuses on two of antiquity’s most famous statues—Phidias’s Athena Parthenos (Minerva) and Praxiteles’s Aphrodite of Knidos (Venus)—and how Cicero discusses and alludes to them in his dialogue “Brutus” (46 BCE).

Christopher van den Berg is the Andrew Heiskell/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and Associate Professor, Department of Classics, Amherst College.

Kate Thomas
Lesbian Arcadia: the Villa Gamberaia at the fin-de-siecle

At the turn of the nineteenth to the twentieth century, Florence and its surrounding hills was so sought out and settled by Anglo-American expatriate lesbian artists and writers that contemporary commentators described the landscape as devoted to the “cult of women.” This lecture will focus on the Villa Gamberaia and its gardens. A highly celebrated Renaissance estate that was in decline by the nineteenth century, the Villa was lovingly restored by the Princess Ghyka and her partner Florence Blood from 1896 to 1925. She will explore how the garden’s features of nymphaeum, water parterre, secret garden, grotto and bosco can be seen to express what the novelist EM Forster called a “gay greenwood.” Drawing on recent theory on “vibrant matter” and “plant thinking” that see landscapes as mobile, sentient and desiring, she will reach toward a reading of how ruined and reinvented Italian landscapes shaped modern queer, particularly lesbian, cultural estate.

Kate Thomas is the Garden Club of America Rome Prize Fellow in Landscape Architecture and K. Laurence Stapleton Professor of English, Bryn Mawr College.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Watch the Livestream
 

Parrish Elizabeth Wright & Giovanna Silva

Monday, March 9, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Giovanna Silva

Canceled

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS SHOPTALK HAS BEEN CANCELED.

Parrish Elizabeth Wright
Mythologies of Identity and Alliance in Southern Italy

In this talk, Parrish Elizabeth Wright will discuss the ways in which cities and ethnic groups in southern Italy from the sixth to third centuries BCE used mythology and foundation narratives as tools to mediate across groups. Through the figure of Heracles, she shows how Greeks and native Italians living in close proximity negotiated alliances based on shared mythology.

Wright is the Samuel H. Kress Foundation Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and a PhD candidate in the Interdepartmental Program in Greek and Roman History at the University of Michigan.

Giovanna Silva
Narratives/Relazioni: How to Make a Book from a Journey through Architecture

Giovanna Silva is the ENEL Foundation Italian Fellow in Architecture, Urban Design, and Landscape Architecture.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Matthew Brennan & James Casebere

Monday, April 27, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Matthew Brennan

Canceled

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS SHOPTALK HAS BEEN CANCELED.

Matthew Brennan is the Booth Family Rome Prize Fellow in Historic Preservation and Conservation and a PhD candidate in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University in Bloomington.

James Casebere is the Abigail Cohen Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and an artist based in Canaan, New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Melanie Masterton Sherazi & Corinna Gosmaro

Monday, March 30, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Corinna Gosmaro (photograph by Daniele Molajoli)

Canceled

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS SHOPTALK HAS BEEN CANCELED.

Melanie Masterton Sherazi
A Janus-time”: Experimental African American Literature and Visual Arts in Cold War Rome

This talk will situate 1950s and 1960s Rome as a significant hub for African American and Italian modernist innovation and collaboration in literature and the visual arts, with a focus on the cultural work of William Demby and Barbara Chase-Riboud. Their respective crossings of national and media borders generated groundbreaking artistic forms infused with political content related to desegregation, anticolonialism, and antifascism.

Melanie Masterton Sherazi is the Terra Foundation Affiliated Fellow.

Corinna Gosmaro

Corinna Gosmaro is the Fondazione Sviluppo e Crescita CRT Italian Fellow in Visual Arts and an artist based in Turin, Italy.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Courtney Bryan

Monday, March 2, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Courtney Bryan

Courtney Bryan
“Composing in the Spirit”: Collaboration, Improvisation, and Sounds of Freedom

The composer and pianist Courtney Bryan will discuss her creative process developing two current and related projects: Awakening, an opera and Sounds of Freedom, a recording. Both projects are inspired by history and explore themes of freedom, spirit, love, home, and sanctuary. While related thematically, each project approaches the creative process in contrasting yet complementary ways regarding collaboration, improvisation, and notation.

Awakening is a one-act opera based on an imagined contemporary woman who transforms herself out of an oppressive situation with the guidance of the spirits of three nineteenth-century Black women religious leaders and freedom fighters: Rebecca Cox Jackson, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman. Collaborators include the International Contemporary Ensemble, director Charlotte Brathwaite, vocalist Helga Davis, artist Cauleen Smith, librettist Sharan Strange, and dramaturgs Sunder Ganglani and Matthew Morrison.

Bryan’s recent recording project, Sounds of Freedom, is inspired by an experimental music tradition stemming from the Black Arts Movement in New Orleans. Its collaborators include drummer Joe Dyson, saxophonist Stephen Gladney, bassist Brian Quezergue, saxophonists Calvin Johnson and Khari Allen Lee, trumpeter Kevin Louis, and poet Chuck Perkins. Ideas for sounds of freedom in both projects include interviews with her collaborators, with Fellows at the American Academy in Rome, and selected participants in fifth edition of the Black History Month Florence festival.

Bryan is the Samuel Barber Rome Prize Fellow in Musical Composition and an assistant professor in the Newcomb Department of Music at Tulane University.

This shoptalk will be held in English.

Watch the Livestream
 

Corey Tazzara & Sarah Crowner

Monday, March 16, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Sarah Crowner, Sapphire Tapestry Part 1, 2 & 3, 2019, tufted chenille, 80 x 180 x ½ in. (artwork © Sarah Crowner), as seen in the exhibition Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Artists Occupy the Third Dimension in New Orleans

Canceled

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS SHOPTALK HAS BEEN CANCELED.

Corey Tazzara
Pietro Della Valle and Global Catholicism in the Seventeenth Century

Italy during the Renaissance is famed for its achievements in the arts and sciences, as well as for the economic hegemony that its merchants exercised throughout the Mediterranean world. Italy during the seventeenth century is known for its economic decline, political marginalization, and religious obscurantism. This talk will reassess the portrait of Italian decline by examining the career of the lay Roman Pietro Della Valle, who is best known for his travels in Persia and India, and who also played a role in promoting evangelization in the East. His career sheds new light on the way that lay and clerical cultures intersected during the period. It also suggests how the Church’s program for cultural control—best represented by the Inquisition—were at odds with the ideological and practical imperatives of its missionary activity. Italian decline was real, but it was mediated and to some extent alleviated by its global religious ambitions.

Corey Tazzara is the Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and assistant professor in the Department of History at Scripps College.

Sarah Crowner

Sarah Crowner will be discussing her recent projects in painting and terracotta tile installations, including her current investigations into architecture, the cut-out, and performance—and how a seemingly static painting can engage a viewer over time and three-dimensional space. She will show images from her archive and exhibition history and have material samples on hand to pass around.

Crowner is the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and an artist based in Brooklyn, New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Evan A. MacCarthy & David Brooks

Monday, March 23, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

David Brooks, A Proverbial Machine in the Garden, 2013, Dynahoe tractor, concrete, earth, landscape, and steel grating, approximately 66 x 28 x 12 ft. (artwork © David Brooks)

Canceled

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS SHOPTALK HAS BEEN CANCELED.

Evan A. MacCarthy
Eclipsing the Labors of All before Him: Ugolino Urbevetano’s Guide to the Musical Universe

This shoptalk introduces an early fifteenth-century encyclopedic treatise on the speculative and practical natures of music and its author, the priest, composer, and singer Ugolino Urbevetano (d. 1453). Through an examination of the text’s sources, dating from the sixth, eleventh, and fourteenth centuries CE, and its later readers—most especially Franchino Gaffurio (1451–1522), a music theorist, composer, and friend of Leonardo da Vinci, and Giambattista Martini (1706–1784), a Franciscan antiquarian scholar and music teacher—we illuminate more clearly the intellectual foundations of musical science in the early Renaissance as well as its reception for centuries to come.

Evan A. MacCarthy is the National Endowment for the Humanities Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and assistant professor of musicology in the School of Music at West Virginia University.

David Brooks
Spaces, Species, and Situations

In light of Rome’s unique relationship between the individual and the built and natural environments, David Brooks will discuss past projects that contextualize his inquiries while at the American Academy in Rome. Understanding that the division of culture from nature is an ideological construction, much of this research examines the causes and effects of ecological crisis and the cultural impasse it represents, and questions the terms under which nature is perceived and utilized.

Brooks is a Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts. He is an artist based in New York and New Orleans, and is on the faculty of the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Giuliana Mosca & Roberto Lugo

Monday, April 6, 2020 6:00 PM–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Roberto Lugo, Street Shrine 1: A Notorious Story, 2019, installation of three glazed ceramic works (artworks © Roberto Lugo)

Canceled

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS SHOPTALK HAS BEEN CANCELED.

Giuliana Mosca is the Franco Zeffirelli Italian Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and an adjunct professor in the Department of Architecture at Università di Roma Tre.

Roberto Lugo is the Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Rome Prize Fellow in Design and an artist based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Jeremy Simmons & Marsha Ginsberg

Monday, May 4, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy

Imitation Roman aureus of Septimius Severus, found in India (early third century CE?) [ANS 1905.57.375] (photograph by Klaus Vondrovec)

Canceled

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS SHOPTALK HAS BEEN CANCELED.

Jeremy Simmons is the Emeline Hill Richardson/Millicent Mercer Johnsen Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and a PhD Candidate in the Classical Studies Graduate Program at Columbia University.

Marsha Ginsberg is the Rolland Rome Prize Fellow in Design and a performance designer based in New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

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